Welcome to CBI!

We're Asheville's only independent egalitarian Jewish community. More than 100 years old, we’re rediscovering ourselves every day. We love pot-lucks, swapping stories and kids in the sanctuary. Sometimes we sing off key. We learn and laugh together, celebrate and care for each other. Interested in joining?   Click here.

Upcoming Events, Programs and More!

Meet our Rabbi Candidates


Jan. 9th/10th & 16th/17th

Tu B'Shvat Seder

Wednesday, January 27th

"I deeply appreciate the empowerment and support I feel from the CBI leadership to forge our own path, one that is consistent and true to our family without being led to feel like our Judaism is lacking.” - Ali Climo

This is Us

We're a blended family. Old and young, Jews by birth and Jews by choice; from L.A., Miami, Atlanta and Brooklyn - London, Johannesburg and places with names too hard to pronounce. We celebrate together: single moms and newly retired couples, inter-faith and inter-racial families. And all of us - observant, secular and agnostic - find common ground in community.

"For the first time in my life, I find myself yearning to go to shul.”  - Rochelle Reich

This is what we're up to...

This is what we're talking about...

Jan
29
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Jan 29 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

There will be No Study Group Meeting on Friday, January 29

Last week we concluded our discussion of Michael Stanislawski’s Zionism: A Short Introduction.  In considering developments in Zionism in the last decade of the twentieth century and the first decades of the twenty-first century, we focused especially on Israel’s economic growth since 1990s (with lots of help from Tom Glaser, one of our participants).  After briefly discussing the many splits between various factions (both Zionist and non-Zionist), we turned our attention to UN resolutions that ”Zionism is racism” and the rescinding of such resolutions.  Our discussion included looking at how anti-Zionist arguments could sometimes serve as masks for anti-Semitism, and how proponents of Zionist ideals could still argue against policies of the Israeli government (occupation and new settlements).   I think it’s safe to say that many of us came away feeling as though we had a better understanding of Zionism (in its many iterations), but we also acknowledged that we had barely scratched the surface of this complex topic.
 After taking a Friday off for good behavior, our group will return on February 5 to a new subject for study–

The Book of Esther

This romantic, patriotic, and comic tale commemorates the delivery of the Persian Jewish community from possible annihilation during the 5th century BCE.  We’ll be studying it for three Fridays in February leading up to the festival of Purim, celebrated this year on February 24 and 25.   Our focus will be on the many ways that the Book of Esther (which can be found in any standard Bible; we welcome a variety of translations) might be interpreted and its relevance to us in the 21st Century.  Because our time is limited, we encourage participants to read the Book of Esther in its entirety–the whole megillah–prior to our first discussion on February 5 (it’s less than 15 pages).
Our informal discussion group is held online every Friday from 12-1.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. If you have questions, or would like the Zoom link, please contact Jay Jacoby at  jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Online Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI
Jan 29 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Online Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

With services unavoidably cancelled, the Ritual Committee is working hard to find ways we can support each other as a community when we can’t be together in person. It’s very distressing to be unable to say Kaddish for a loved one, or to contemplate not sharing a Seder meal with friends and family. We’d like to share with you some plans we have for filling these gaps in our lives.

Please join us for Kabbalat Shabbat services via Zoom.  As long as at least 10 adults log in, we’ll be able to say Kaddish, so please consider attending, even if you’re not a Friday night regular.

You can join the service by going to Our Virtual Community here, then scroll down and click on the blue Kabbalat Shabbat Service button.

If you’d like to borrow a siddur for use at home while services are cancelled, we’ll be happy to lend you one!  Please contact the office for details.

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Jan
30
Sat
Torah Study with Justin Goldstein
Jan 30 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Join Justin Goldstein for an hour of Torah study and discussion of the week’s Torah portion.

All are welcome, link to join the Zoom meeting here.

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Jan
31
Sun
Online Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle
Jan 31 @ 2:30 pm

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infusing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us via Zoom (every Sunday from 2:30pm – 4pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. Please contact Linda Wolf at linda@networktype.com for the online meeting information.

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Online Torah on Tap
Jan 31 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
With so much of CBI’s programming unavoidably cancelled, we’re working hard to find ways we can support each other as a community when we can’t be together in person.

Please join me this Sunday, April 26, at 4:00pm, when we will be holding Torah on Tap via Zoom.

A link to the online discussion group is below.  Zoom is easy to use and will let us see and hear each other as we speak.  If you haven’t already downloaded Zoom to your computer or phone, you must do so before joining the meeting on Sunday at 4:00pm.  You only need to download Zoom once, after that you simply log in, always using the same Meeting ID: 819 7668 2790.  Easy instructions are below this message.

This is a temporary measure to keep us all connected while we can’t be together physically.

Alan Silverman

Torah on Tap Host

Instructions for Downloading Zoom

The first time you ever use Zoom on a computer, do the following:

Go to https://zoom.us
Hover over (don’t click) “RESOURCES” on the top right and then click “Download Zoom Client” from the drop-down menu that appears
Click “Download” under “Zoom Client for Meetings”
If it asks you to allow it to download “zoom.us”, click “Allow” or “Yes”
Open the downloaded file and follow the instructions to install Zoom on your computer

The first time you ever use Zoom on a smart phone, do the following:
Go to the App Store and find “Zoom Cloud Meetings” and download it (it is free)

Instructions for attending Torah on Tap on CBI’s Zoom Account:

Right before the start of services, either go to https://zoom.us on your computer or open your Zoom app on your smartphone
Click “Join a Meeting”
Type in this Meeting ID: 819 7668 2790 and click “Join”
If you’re using the computer and Zoom asks you to allow it to open “zoom.us”, click “Allow” or “Yes” or “Open” and then click “Join With Computer Audio”
If you’re using a smart phone and Zoom asks you to allow using the microphone/camera, allow it
If it says “Waiting for the host to start this meeting”, just wait a few minutes for Alan to start the meeting

Join us on the last Sunday of the month online for a refreshing and often provocative discussion. Each month, we take on a new topic – often ripped from the headlines of today’s news. We spend the first 45 minutes wrapping our arms around it, defining it, dissecting and analyzing it from various viewpoints. Then we spend the rest of the time discussing it from Judaism’s point of view.

  • What’s Judaism’s take on universal healthcare?
  • Would Moses walk the streets of Chicago today packing heat?
  • Is it okay to punch a white supremacist?

Torah on Tap gives us a chance to learn, vent, share and, most of all, understand what 4,000 years of cultural development, debate and dialogue has to say about some of the issues that confront us today. Torah on Tap is free and open to all. Varying viewpoints are not only welcome, but encouraged.

See you there!

 

 

 

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Feb
3
Wed
Anti-Semitism, White Supremacy and Racism
Feb 3 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Anti-Semitism, White Supremacy and Racism 
Wednesday, February 3, 7:00pm

All are invited to a Zoom discussion moderated by Deborah Miles.  Please read Eric K. Ward’s article before the discussion.  Zoom link to join discussion here.

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Feb
5
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Feb 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

There will be No Study Group Meeting on Friday, January 29

Last week we concluded our discussion of Michael Stanislawski’s Zionism: A Short Introduction.  In considering developments in Zionism in the last decade of the twentieth century and the first decades of the twenty-first century, we focused especially on Israel’s economic growth since 1990s (with lots of help from Tom Glaser, one of our participants).  After briefly discussing the many splits between various factions (both Zionist and non-Zionist), we turned our attention to UN resolutions that ”Zionism is racism” and the rescinding of such resolutions.  Our discussion included looking at how anti-Zionist arguments could sometimes serve as masks for anti-Semitism, and how proponents of Zionist ideals could still argue against policies of the Israeli government (occupation and new settlements).   I think it’s safe to say that many of us came away feeling as though we had a better understanding of Zionism (in its many iterations), but we also acknowledged that we had barely scratched the surface of this complex topic.
 After taking a Friday off for good behavior, our group will return on February 5 to a new subject for study–

The Book of Esther

This romantic, patriotic, and comic tale commemorates the delivery of the Persian Jewish community from possible annihilation during the 5th century BCE.  We’ll be studying it for three Fridays in February leading up to the festival of Purim, celebrated this year on February 24 and 25.   Our focus will be on the many ways that the Book of Esther (which can be found in any standard Bible; we welcome a variety of translations) might be interpreted and its relevance to us in the 21st Century.  Because our time is limited, we encourage participants to read the Book of Esther in its entirety–the whole megillah–prior to our first discussion on February 5 (it’s less than 15 pages).
Our informal discussion group is held online every Friday from 12-1.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. If you have questions, or would like the Zoom link, please contact Jay Jacoby at  jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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“CBI nurtures my spiritual life, especially the Shabbos experience - the participatory services and the Kiddush luncheon, which allows us to visit and get to know each other.” – Jimi Moore