Welcome to CBI!

We're Asheville's only independent egalitarian Jewish community. More than 100 years old, we’re rediscovering ourselves every day. We love pot-lucks, swapping stories and kids in the sanctuary. Sometimes we sing off key. We learn and laugh together, celebrate and care for each other. Interested in joining?   Click here.

Torah on Tap

Sunday, January 29, 4pm

 Wedge Brewery

Next to 12 Bones on Foundy Street

Details here.

 

CBI Winter 

Meeting


 Sunday, February 5, 11am
Save the date!

 

Bob Dylan Shabbat

February 17-18

at CBI, CBHT, JCC, UNCA

Details here.

Friday Noon

Study Group


 Join Jay Jacoby
Fridays at noon
on Zoom only.
Details here

Friday Night

Kabbalat Shabbat

& Potluck 


 Friday, February 10, 6:00pm
Join Josefa Briant for services
followed by a vegetarian potluck.


Kiddush

For Breakfast 


Saturday, February 11, 9:30am
Rabbi Mitch will lead a 
learning session at 9:30am
followed by abbreviated services at 10:15am.

Awakening the Heart 


 Join us on
Saturday, February 25, 9:30am
for a contemplative
Shabbat practice.

Details

Havdalah Art Club

Original Art Work by Tikva Wolf
Each Saturday at 6pm

Rabbi Mitch Levine

Rabbi Mitch Levine:  Office phone (828) 252-9024, email rabbi@bethisraelnc.org
CBI is thrilled to have Rabbi Mitchell Levine as our spiritual leader. Rabbi Levine started on July 1, 2021.  He and his wife Alison, also a Jewish educator by profession, moved to Asheville from Columbus, Ohio. Rabbi Levine has had a rich and diverse career as both a pulpit rabbi and Jewish educator. Born and raised in Raleigh, Rabbi Levine most recently served as Rabbi of Agudas Achim in Bexley Ohio, a position he held for 10 years. Prior to that, he served as the Rabbi at Beth Sholom in Providence, RI where he also served as rabbinic associate at Brown University Hillel and taught at the Providence Hebrew Day School and New England Academy of Torah High School. In addition, he has studied at the Pardes Institute of Jewish Learning, the Jewish Theological Seminary, Harvard Jewish Theological Seminary, the reconstructionist Rabbinical College, and was a Fellow at the Day School Leadership Training Institute of the Jewish Theological Seminary. 

"I deeply appreciate the empowerment and support I feel from the CBI leadership to forge our own path, one that is consistent and true to our family without being led to feel like our Judaism is lacking." - Ali Climo

This is Us

We're a blended family. Old and young, Jews by birth and Jews by choice; from L.A., Miami, Atlanta and Brooklyn - London, Johannesburg and places with names too hard to pronounce. We celebrate together: single moms and newly retired couples, inter-faith and inter-racial families. And all of us - observant, secular and agnostic - find common ground in community.

"For the first time in my life, I find myself yearning to go to shul."  - Rochelle Reich

This is what we're up to...

This is what we're talking about...

Feb
3
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Feb 3 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Online Friday Noon Study Group

Friday Noon Study Group  February 3  12-1

We began last Friday’s discussion of the Epistle to the Hebrews with a reminder of how frequently this text drew upon verbatim citations from the Tanach  (Chapters 1-4 in Hebrews directly cited excerpts from Psalms 102:25ff., 110:11, 8:4-6, 22:22, 15:7-11, and Isaiah 8: 17-18).  We speculated that such extensive reference to Hebrew scripture had the effect of making the author of Hebrews more credible (he/she had a mastery of Tanach) and of making the author’s audience more comfortable by citing from texts with which they were familiar.
We then took a closer look at chapters 5-7 in Hebrews, chapters that focused upon the priesthood of Christ, furthering the case for his superiority as an intermediary between God and Man/Man and God.  These chapters confirm the concept, expressed earlier in the Hebrew Bible, that the Messiah would be a Davidic figure,  appointed by divine decree:  “The Lord hath sworn . . . ‘Thou art a priest for ever in the manner of Melchizedek'” (Psalm 110:4/ Hebrews 5:5-6).  A good portion of our discussion was devoted to an exploration of who Melchizedek was.  He appears in Genesis 14:18 as a Canaanite King and Priest who blesses Abram.  Christian tradition associates Melchizedek, (“king of righteousness””king of peace”) with the “eternal priesthood” of Christ.  In the Epistle to the Hebrews (and also in the Dead Sea Scrolls), Melchizedek is seen as a divine being who will judge and atone for his people.  According to an encyclopedia entry shared by one of our participants, “Melchizedek is made to foreshadow Christ. . . .  According to the analogy, just as Abraham, the ancestor of the Levites, paid a tithe to Melchizedek and was therefore his inferior, so the Melchizedek-like priesthood of Christ is superior to the Levites.”
We concluded our discussion session last week in the middle of Hebrews, Chapter 7:11-12, which suggests that not only was the Levitical priesthood superseded by “another priest arising according to the order of Melchizedek,” but that “when there is a change in the priesthood, there is necessarily a change in the law as well.”
This Friday, we’ll further examine the passages just cited and then continue our exploration of the Epistle to the Hebrews with a closer look at Chapters 7:11-Chapter 10. 
Our discussion group meets via Zoom every Friday from 12-1 (see the CBI web site or Weekly Announcements for a Zoom link).  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions. Any copy of the New Testament is acceptable (the more versions the richer the conversation). 
 
 
 
 

      

 

 

 

 

 
 

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Feb
4
Sat
HIAS Refugee Shabbat @ CBI
Feb 4 @ 9:30 am

Refugee Shabbat 2023

Refugee Shabbat, which will take place on February 3-4, 2023, is a moment for congregations, organizations, and individuals in the United States and around the world to dedicate a Shabbat experience to refugees and asylum seekers. The fastest-growing European refugee crisis since World War II is still ongoing. People seeking asylum are being turned away at borders around the world. And this year, for the first time ever, the total number of displaced persons globally is over 100 million. This is a critical moment for all of us to reaffirm and redouble our support for refugees and asylum seekers.

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Saturday Morning In-Person and Online Services
Feb 4 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for Shabbat morning services in-person or via Zoom every Saturday morning at 9:30am.

Masks and social distancing are still required for all services that are likely to include singing and chanting.
Masks and social distancing are optional for all smaller, non-singing/chanting gatherings for fully vaccinated individuals.
Unvaccinated adults should always wear a mask.
Beginning with Saturday July 3rd, we will return to holding Shabbat morning services every Shabbat.  You will still be required to register in advance to attend services in the event that contract tracing should become necessary.  You can register online through the Wednesday weekly eblast.  If you’d like to receive the weekly eblast, click here.

Join the Zoom service by going to Our Virtual Community page here, then scroll down and click on the blue Saturday Morning Service button.

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Havdalah Ritual & Intuitive Creative Artwork @ CBI
Feb 4 @ 6:00 pm
Havdalah Ritual & Intuitive Creative Artwork @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Join us every Saturday at 6pm for havdalah ritual followed by intuitive artwork creation! The individual and collaborative pieces we make together will be part of a Shavuot art display on our “collective revelation” this Spring. Bring your own art supplies/project or just show up! !

Organized by Tikva Wolf (text her with questions: 919-5-TIKVAH).

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Feb
5
Sun
CBI Winter Congregational Meeting
Feb 5 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm

CBI members are invited to hear updates from Executive Director Rochelle Reich, President Danielle Tocaben, and the CBI Treasurer.

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Feb
10
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Feb 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Online Friday Noon Study Group

Friday Noon Study Group  February 3  12-1

We began last Friday’s discussion of the Epistle to the Hebrews with a reminder of how frequently this text drew upon verbatim citations from the Tanach  (Chapters 1-4 in Hebrews directly cited excerpts from Psalms 102:25ff., 110:11, 8:4-6, 22:22, 15:7-11, and Isaiah 8: 17-18).  We speculated that such extensive reference to Hebrew scripture had the effect of making the author of Hebrews more credible (he/she had a mastery of Tanach) and of making the author’s audience more comfortable by citing from texts with which they were familiar.
We then took a closer look at chapters 5-7 in Hebrews, chapters that focused upon the priesthood of Christ, furthering the case for his superiority as an intermediary between God and Man/Man and God.  These chapters confirm the concept, expressed earlier in the Hebrew Bible, that the Messiah would be a Davidic figure,  appointed by divine decree:  “The Lord hath sworn . . . ‘Thou art a priest for ever in the manner of Melchizedek'” (Psalm 110:4/ Hebrews 5:5-6).  A good portion of our discussion was devoted to an exploration of who Melchizedek was.  He appears in Genesis 14:18 as a Canaanite King and Priest who blesses Abram.  Christian tradition associates Melchizedek, (“king of righteousness””king of peace”) with the “eternal priesthood” of Christ.  In the Epistle to the Hebrews (and also in the Dead Sea Scrolls), Melchizedek is seen as a divine being who will judge and atone for his people.  According to an encyclopedia entry shared by one of our participants, “Melchizedek is made to foreshadow Christ. . . .  According to the analogy, just as Abraham, the ancestor of the Levites, paid a tithe to Melchizedek and was therefore his inferior, so the Melchizedek-like priesthood of Christ is superior to the Levites.”
We concluded our discussion session last week in the middle of Hebrews, Chapter 7:11-12, which suggests that not only was the Levitical priesthood superseded by “another priest arising according to the order of Melchizedek,” but that “when there is a change in the priesthood, there is necessarily a change in the law as well.”
This Friday, we’ll further examine the passages just cited and then continue our exploration of the Epistle to the Hebrews with a closer look at Chapters 7:11-Chapter 10. 
Our discussion group meets via Zoom every Friday from 12-1 (see the CBI web site or Weekly Announcements for a Zoom link).  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions. Any copy of the New Testament is acceptable (the more versions the richer the conversation). 
 
 
 
 

      

 

 

 

 

 
 

Sharing is caring
Feb
11
Sat
Saturday Morning In-Person and Online Services
Feb 11 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for Shabbat morning services in-person or via Zoom every Saturday morning at 9:30am.

Masks and social distancing are still required for all services that are likely to include singing and chanting.
Masks and social distancing are optional for all smaller, non-singing/chanting gatherings for fully vaccinated individuals.
Unvaccinated adults should always wear a mask.
Beginning with Saturday July 3rd, we will return to holding Shabbat morning services every Shabbat.  You will still be required to register in advance to attend services in the event that contract tracing should become necessary.  You can register online through the Wednesday weekly eblast.  If you’d like to receive the weekly eblast, click here.

Join the Zoom service by going to Our Virtual Community page here, then scroll down and click on the blue Saturday Morning Service button.

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"CBI nurtures my spiritual life, especially the Shabbos experience - the participatory services and the Kiddush luncheon, which allows us to visit and get to know each other." – Jimi Moore