Welcome to CBI!

We're Asheville's only independent egalitarian Jewish community. More than 100 years old, we’re rediscovering ourselves every day. We love pot-lucks, swapping stories and kids in the sanctuary. Sometimes we sing off key. We learn and laugh together, celebrate and care for each other. Interested in joining?   Click here.

Upcoming Events and Info

Friday Noon Study Group 


 Join Jay Jacoby
Fridays at noon
in person at CBI or on Zoom.

Details here

Lunch & Learn

with Rabbi Mitch


Tuesday, July 12, 12:00pm

Topic: Abortion in Jewish Texts
Join Rabbi Mitch for a potluck (veggie)
lunch & learn.

 

 

 

Awakening the Heart 


 Join Rick Chess on
Saturday, July 23, 9:30am
in the CBI social hall
for a contemplative
Shabbat practice.

Details & RSVP

Torah on Tap


Tuesday, July 26, 6:00pm

Archetype Brewery, 174 Broadway St.
Join Alan Silverman
in exploring timely topics
viewed through a Jewish lens.

 

 

Dinner at 

Jerusalem Garden Cafe


Thursday, July 28, 5:00pm

Join CBI friends for a fun, relaxing
dinner at Jerusalem Garden Cafe.
RSVP to Helene at club.havurah@gmail.com

 

Breakfast & Study

with Rabbi Mitch


Saturday, July 30, 9:30am

Topic: Why God Needs a Husband
Join Rabbi Mitch for a Shabbat
study session over catered breakfast
followed by abbreviated services
at 10:30am.

 

 

 

Erev Tisha b'Av

with Rabbi Mitch

 


Saturday, August 6, 9:00pm

Join Rabbi Mitch
for a reading of Eikha
(The Book of Lamentations)

 

 

 

Fabric Explorations


 Artist Workshop led by
Suzie Beringer
August 1-4, 2022
at CBI

Details & RSVP

Many Thanks to Our

CBI 2nd Annual

Golf Classic Sponsors

Click to see them here:
2022Golf Sponsors Logos 2.

Rabbi Mitch Levine

Rabbi Mitch Levine:  Office phone (828) 252-9024, email rabbi@bethisraelnc.org
CBI is thrilled to have Rabbi Mitchell Levine as our spiritual leader. Rabbi Levine started on July 1, 2021.  He and his wife Alison, also a Jewish educator by profession, moved to Asheville from Columbus, Ohio. Rabbi Levine has had a rich and diverse career as both a pulpit rabbi and Jewish educator. Born and raised in Raleigh, Rabbi Levine most recently served as Rabbi of Agudas Achim in Bexley Ohio, a position he held for 10 years. Prior to that, he served as the Rabbi at Beth Sholom in Providence, RI where he also served as rabbinic associate at Brown University Hillel and taught at the Providence Hebrew Day School and New England Academy of Torah High School. In addition, he has studied at the Pardes Institute of Jewish Learning, the Jewish Theological Seminary, Harvard Jewish Theological Seminary, the reconstructionist Rabbinical College, and was a Fellow at the Day School Leadership Training Institute of the Jewish Theological Seminary. 

"I deeply appreciate the empowerment and support I feel from the CBI leadership to forge our own path, one that is consistent and true to our family without being led to feel like our Judaism is lacking.” - Ali Climo

This is Us

We're a blended family. Old and young, Jews by birth and Jews by choice; from L.A., Miami, Atlanta and Brooklyn - London, Johannesburg and places with names too hard to pronounce. We celebrate together: single moms and newly retired couples, inter-faith and inter-racial families. And all of us - observant, secular and agnostic - find common ground in community.

"For the first time in my life, I find myself yearning to go to shul.”  - Rochelle Reich

This is what we're up to...

This is what we're talking about...

Jul
3
Sun
Online Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle
Jul 3 @ 2:30 pm

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infusing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us via Zoom (every Sunday from 2:30pm – 4pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. Please contact Linda Wolf at linda@networktype.com for the online meeting information.

Sharing is caring
Jul
6
Wed
Down Home Exhibit Opening & Reception
Jul 6 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

The Down Home Exhibit
The Down Home Exhibit is a traveling museum experience produced by Jewish Heritage of North Carolina.
The exhibit takes an experiential, values-oriented approach in telling the narrative of Jewish life in North Carolina. This traveling museum exhibition documented 400 years of Jewish presence. From its debut at the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh in 2011, it traveled to the Cape Fear Museum in Wilmington, the Greensboro Historical Museum, and the Levine Museum of the New South in Charlotte. The exhibit will now call Beth Israel home for the month of July.
An opening night reception will be held on Wednesday evening July 6th at 7:30pm and will feature historians Leonard Rogoff and Asheville’s own Sharon Fahrer.  Leonard is the president and lead historian for Jewish Heritage of North Carolina and is the author of Down Home: Jewish Life in North Carolina. Both Leonard and Sharon are experienced experts on Jewish Life in the South.
Also on display will be several artifacts from the Beth Israel archives on loan from the Ramsey Library at UNCA.

To learn more about the exhibit visit www.jewishnc.org.

Sharing is caring
Jul
8
Fri
In-person & Online Friday Noon Study Group
Jul 8 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
In-person & Online Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, July 1 

The Noon Study Group will NOT meet on 7/1.

We will resume meeting on 7/8. 

We began last Friday’s session by reviewing some of the  motivations Dara Horn ascribed to those who rescued Jews in chapter 8 of People Love Dead Jews: 1) they were possibly adrenaline junkies who saw the whole rescue process as an adventure worth taking a risk for; 2) their actions may have been instinctive, motivated by an altruistic gene; 3) it was the morally right thing to do; 4) they wanted to feel important (or, in Fry’s case, to “hang-out” with important people); 5) they may have been somehow deranged, bi-polar, unhinged.  We concluded that such motivations are multiply determined and impossible to pin down, even if the rescuers themselves try to account for them.  We also discussed reasons that those who were rescued may not have displayed their gratitude–“survivor guilt” that they were saved while others perished, they were humiliated by their dependence upon another for their survival, or they just wanted to put the whole unpleasant experience behind them.  We concluded our discussion of this long and ambiguous chapter by considering Horn’s point that, in addition to, or far from being inspirational, these stories “make painfully clear everything that might have been” because so many others were not rescued.
Our group then turned its attention to Chapter 9, about a digital mapping program that permits viewers to visit lost Jewish Communities (https://diarna.org/).  We all seemed to agree that Horn was far more straightforward, positive–and less snarky–in her portrait of an organization dedicated to using technology in “preserving places that apathy and malevolence have almost erased from the world.”  Horn’s interest in Diarna ties in with her preoccupation with the irretrievability of the past and with how Jewish and other traditions intend to protect their culture from oblivion, and, in the case of Diarna, to demonstrate that past cultures existed in a world that was far more heterogeneous than the world we observe today.
Following our discussion of Chapter 9, our group once again considered some of the potential ways of interpreting the provocative title of Horn’s essay collection.  People like dead Jews
  • because they hate us/literally people like Jews dead
  • because they are fascinated/obsessed with antiquity and wish to preserve our memory–or to exploit, by profiting from, our memory
  • because they see Jews as metaphors/symbols of endurance, faith, freedom and/or they see our persecution as a sign of the depths to which civilization can sink
  • because they can somehow objectify us and our experience in order to teach a powerful lesson.
When we resume meeting on July 8, we will look at Chapters 10 and 11, which deal with an exhibition on Auschwitz at New York’s Museum of Jewish Heritage
(https://mjhnyc.org/exhibitions/auschwitz/),
and on the figure of Shakespeare’s Shylock.
Now in its 23rd year, our informal discussion group meets in person from 12-1 in CBI’s small chapel (with an option on Zoom for those who cannot attend in person).  All are welcome to attend regardless of their level of expertise.  Copies of Horn’s collection should be available in local bookstores and through the internet.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.
 

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

 
 

Sharing is caring
Jul
9
Sat
Saturday Morning In-Person and Online Services
Jul 9 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for Shabbat morning services in-person or via Zoom every Saturday morning at 9:30am.

Masks and social distancing are still required for all services that are likely to include singing and chanting.
Masks and social distancing are optional for all smaller, non-singing/chanting gatherings for fully vaccinated individuals.
Unvaccinated adults should always wear a mask.
Beginning with Saturday July 3rd, we will return to holding Shabbat morning services every Shabbat.  You will still be required to register in advance to attend services in the event that contract tracing should become necessary.  You can register online through the Wednesday weekly eblast.  If you’d like to receive the weekly eblast, click here.

Join the Zoom service by going to Our Virtual Community page here, then scroll down and click on the blue Saturday Morning Service button.

Sharing is caring
Jul
12
Tue
Lunch & Learn: Abortion in Jewish Texts
Jul 12 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

Jewish Law frames the abortion issue very differently than it is presented by contemporary debate. By looking at how our foundational texts regard the issue, we will be introduced to a perspective which is nuanced, compassionate, and surprisingly progressive for an ancient, patriarchal tradition.

Lunch is potluck and vegetarian, but we’ll have baked ziti available for those who RSVP by July 6.

Sharing is caring
Jul
15
Fri
In-person & Online Friday Noon Study Group
Jul 15 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
In-person & Online Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, July 1 

The Noon Study Group will NOT meet on 7/1.

We will resume meeting on 7/8. 

We began last Friday’s session by reviewing some of the  motivations Dara Horn ascribed to those who rescued Jews in chapter 8 of People Love Dead Jews: 1) they were possibly adrenaline junkies who saw the whole rescue process as an adventure worth taking a risk for; 2) their actions may have been instinctive, motivated by an altruistic gene; 3) it was the morally right thing to do; 4) they wanted to feel important (or, in Fry’s case, to “hang-out” with important people); 5) they may have been somehow deranged, bi-polar, unhinged.  We concluded that such motivations are multiply determined and impossible to pin down, even if the rescuers themselves try to account for them.  We also discussed reasons that those who were rescued may not have displayed their gratitude–“survivor guilt” that they were saved while others perished, they were humiliated by their dependence upon another for their survival, or they just wanted to put the whole unpleasant experience behind them.  We concluded our discussion of this long and ambiguous chapter by considering Horn’s point that, in addition to, or far from being inspirational, these stories “make painfully clear everything that might have been” because so many others were not rescued.
Our group then turned its attention to Chapter 9, about a digital mapping program that permits viewers to visit lost Jewish Communities (https://diarna.org/).  We all seemed to agree that Horn was far more straightforward, positive–and less snarky–in her portrait of an organization dedicated to using technology in “preserving places that apathy and malevolence have almost erased from the world.”  Horn’s interest in Diarna ties in with her preoccupation with the irretrievability of the past and with how Jewish and other traditions intend to protect their culture from oblivion, and, in the case of Diarna, to demonstrate that past cultures existed in a world that was far more heterogeneous than the world we observe today.
Following our discussion of Chapter 9, our group once again considered some of the potential ways of interpreting the provocative title of Horn’s essay collection.  People like dead Jews
  • because they hate us/literally people like Jews dead
  • because they are fascinated/obsessed with antiquity and wish to preserve our memory–or to exploit, by profiting from, our memory
  • because they see Jews as metaphors/symbols of endurance, faith, freedom and/or they see our persecution as a sign of the depths to which civilization can sink
  • because they can somehow objectify us and our experience in order to teach a powerful lesson.
When we resume meeting on July 8, we will look at Chapters 10 and 11, which deal with an exhibition on Auschwitz at New York’s Museum of Jewish Heritage
(https://mjhnyc.org/exhibitions/auschwitz/),
and on the figure of Shakespeare’s Shylock.
Now in its 23rd year, our informal discussion group meets in person from 12-1 in CBI’s small chapel (with an option on Zoom for those who cannot attend in person).  All are welcome to attend regardless of their level of expertise.  Copies of Horn’s collection should be available in local bookstores and through the internet.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.
 

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

 
 

Sharing is caring
Jul
16
Sat
Saturday Morning In-Person and Online Services
Jul 16 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for Shabbat morning services in-person or via Zoom every Saturday morning at 9:30am.

Masks and social distancing are still required for all services that are likely to include singing and chanting.
Masks and social distancing are optional for all smaller, non-singing/chanting gatherings for fully vaccinated individuals.
Unvaccinated adults should always wear a mask.
Beginning with Saturday July 3rd, we will return to holding Shabbat morning services every Shabbat.  You will still be required to register in advance to attend services in the event that contract tracing should become necessary.  You can register online through the Wednesday weekly eblast.  If you’d like to receive the weekly eblast, click here.

Join the Zoom service by going to Our Virtual Community page here, then scroll down and click on the blue Saturday Morning Service button.

Sharing is caring

“CBI nurtures my spiritual life, especially the Shabbos experience - the participatory services and the Kiddush luncheon, which allows us to visit and get to know each other.” – Jimi Moore