CBI Calendar

Dec
19
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Dec 19 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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Dec
21
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Dec 21 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, December 21, 12:00-1:00

Sixteen participants were on board last week at our inaugural session on the topic of Jewish Humor. We shared some jokes, and explored one–a story of mistaken identity–at great length.  We discussed two attributes of that story that may have made it particularly Jewish:  1)  it reflected an aversion to physical violence–substituting wit, or verbal combativeness (we fully acknowledged that we cannot ascribe this attitude to all Jews–especially after the establishment of the State of Israel); 2) it exhibited certain thought patterns (Talmudic argumentation) which find logical solutions to seemingly impossible problems.  We also talked about the joke we explored as one that would be particularly enjoyed by people who had been oppressed or otherwise experienced an underdog status, noting that such people sometimes combat the cause of their anxieties by laughing at them.  Needless to say, our discussion wasn’t entirely academic–several jokes were shared along the way.

In the introduction to his book,  Telushkin observes that a Jewish sensibility shows concern for certain subjects and values.  Last week, we began to discuss two of those subjects:  antisemitism and financial success.  This week we’ll continue to look at those and other subjects that may preoccupy a Jewish sensibility (and whether Jews have a monopoly on such preoccupations).  Our focus will be guided by the introduction and first chapter of Telushkin’s Jewish Humor:  What the Best Jewish Jokes Say About Jews (pp. 15-39).

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the Social Hall at the newly renovated Congregation Beth Israel on Murdock Avenue.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise.   Copies of Telushkin’s book are available on a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

 

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Dec
26
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Dec 26 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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Dec
28
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Dec 28 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, December 21, 12:00-1:00

Sixteen participants were on board last week at our inaugural session on the topic of Jewish Humor. We shared some jokes, and explored one–a story of mistaken identity–at great length.  We discussed two attributes of that story that may have made it particularly Jewish:  1)  it reflected an aversion to physical violence–substituting wit, or verbal combativeness (we fully acknowledged that we cannot ascribe this attitude to all Jews–especially after the establishment of the State of Israel); 2) it exhibited certain thought patterns (Talmudic argumentation) which find logical solutions to seemingly impossible problems.  We also talked about the joke we explored as one that would be particularly enjoyed by people who had been oppressed or otherwise experienced an underdog status, noting that such people sometimes combat the cause of their anxieties by laughing at them.  Needless to say, our discussion wasn’t entirely academic–several jokes were shared along the way.

In the introduction to his book,  Telushkin observes that a Jewish sensibility shows concern for certain subjects and values.  Last week, we began to discuss two of those subjects:  antisemitism and financial success.  This week we’ll continue to look at those and other subjects that may preoccupy a Jewish sensibility (and whether Jews have a monopoly on such preoccupations).  Our focus will be guided by the introduction and first chapter of Telushkin’s Jewish Humor:  What the Best Jewish Jokes Say About Jews (pp. 15-39).

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the Social Hall at the newly renovated Congregation Beth Israel on Murdock Avenue.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise.   Copies of Telushkin’s book are available on a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

 

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Dec
30
Sun
Torah on Tap @ Habitat Tavern and Commons
Dec 30 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Torah on Tap @ Habitat Tavern and Commons | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Join us on the last Sunday of the month at Habitat Tavern and Commons for a refreshing and often provacative discussion over a pint (or two) of great brew. Each month, we take on a new topic – often ripped from the headlines of today’s news. We spend the first 45 minutes wrapping our arms arouund it, defining it, disecting it and analyzing from various viewpoints. Then we spend the rest of the time discussing it from Judaism’s point of view.

  • What’s Judaism’s take on universal healthcare?
  • Would Moses walk the streets of Chicago today packing heat?
  • Is it okay to punch a white supremacist?

Torah on Tap guves us a chance to learn, vent, share and, most of all, understand what 4,000 years of cutural development, debate and dialogue has to say about some of the issues that confront us today.

Unless otherwise announced, we meet at Habitat Tavern, located on Broadway St., next door to Moog Music Inc. You can find plenty of parking at the back of the building. Torah on Tap is free and open to all. Varying viewpoints are not only welcome, but encouraged. Habitat does not serve food and their selection of non-alcoholic beverages is limited. Feel free to bring in snacks, sodas, etc.

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