CBI Events Calendar

Oct
18
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Oct 18 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, October 11, 12:00-1:00

The Noon Study group will NOT meet on Friday, October 11. 

Last week we discussed Chapter’s 10 and 11 Rabbi Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World.   Several of us agreed that these were the most lucid chapters that we’ve read so far–provided that we accept that the Hebrew Bible is a foundational text for Western Civilization.  Sacks contends that the Hebrew Bible is an “extended essay on human responsibility.”  These chapters begin his chronological demonstration of how biblical stories direct human ethics starting with the Book of Genesis.  Adam and Eve denied personal responsibility, shifting blame to one another and God.  Cain denies that responsibility is an imperative, asking “Am I my Brother’s Keeper?” Noah acted as though he were responsible only to himself and his family, not others.  The builders of the Tower of Babel usurped the role of God, thinking they were answerable to no one but themselves. It is not until Abraham and his plea for the inhabitants of Sodom that we see moral responsibility exercised.  This continues with the generation of Moses and the Israelites’ acceptance of the covenant at Sinai:  “We will do everything that the Lord has said.”  With that pledge human initiative combines with divine initiative–God may have begun the work, but we are asked to complete it. 
When we resume on October 18, we’ll take up Chapters 12 and 13:  “The Holy and the Good” and “The Monotheistic Imagination.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library (or the Social Hall if our group is too large).  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Oct
25
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Oct 25 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, October 11, 12:00-1:00

The Noon Study group will NOT meet on Friday, October 11. 

Last week we discussed Chapter’s 10 and 11 Rabbi Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World.   Several of us agreed that these were the most lucid chapters that we’ve read so far–provided that we accept that the Hebrew Bible is a foundational text for Western Civilization.  Sacks contends that the Hebrew Bible is an “extended essay on human responsibility.”  These chapters begin his chronological demonstration of how biblical stories direct human ethics starting with the Book of Genesis.  Adam and Eve denied personal responsibility, shifting blame to one another and God.  Cain denies that responsibility is an imperative, asking “Am I my Brother’s Keeper?” Noah acted as though he were responsible only to himself and his family, not others.  The builders of the Tower of Babel usurped the role of God, thinking they were answerable to no one but themselves. It is not until Abraham and his plea for the inhabitants of Sodom that we see moral responsibility exercised.  This continues with the generation of Moses and the Israelites’ acceptance of the covenant at Sinai:  “We will do everything that the Lord has said.”  With that pledge human initiative combines with divine initiative–God may have begun the work, but we are asked to complete it. 
When we resume on October 18, we’ll take up Chapters 12 and 13:  “The Holy and the Good” and “The Monotheistic Imagination.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library (or the Social Hall if our group is too large).  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Oct
27
Sun
Torah on Tap @ Archetype Brewing
Oct 27 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Torah on Tap @ Archetype Brewing | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Join us on the last Sunday of the month at Archetype Brewing (dowtown north) for a refreshing and often provocative discussion over a pint (or two) of great brew. Each month, we take on a new topic – often ripped from the headlines of today’s news. We spend the first 45 minutes wrapping our arms around it, defining it, dissecting and analyzing it from various viewpoints. Then we spend the rest of the time discussing it from Judaism’s point of view.

  • What’s Judaism’s take on universal healthcare?
  • Would Moses walk the streets of Chicago today packing heat?
  • Is it okay to punch a white supremacist?

Torah on Tap gives us a chance to learn, vent, share and, most of all, understand what 4,000 years of cultural development, debate and dialogue has to say about some of the issues that confront us today. Torah on Tap is free and open to all. Varying viewpoints are not only welcome, but encouraged.

In addition to drinks, Archetype also offers small, locally-made bites available for purchase, including Poppy Popcorn, Asheville Pretzel Company pretzels, and Hickory Nut Gap Farm meat sticks. Plenty of parking in the rear.

See you there!

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Bonfire, Veggie Potluck & Torah on Tap
Oct 27 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
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Learn to Chant Torah Class
Oct 27 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

LEARN TO CHANT TORAH

You, too, can learn to chant Torah portions on Shabbat! Beth Israel Synagogue
will offer a series of classes this fall on learning the ta’amei ha-mikra (Torah
cantillation marks, or trope). No previous Torah chanting experience is
presumed, but you will need to know how to read Hebrew at least basically (i.e.,
how to pronounce words written in Hebrew, even if you don’t understand them).
It is not necessary to be able to read musical notation. All of the trope used in
regular Shabbat Torah chanting will be covered (we will not cover haftarah
trope or the special tropes used for holidays). The course will also cover the
function of cantillation marks as an aid to understanding the Biblical text and as
a guide for stressing the correct syllable, as well as some of the common
problem areas of proper Hebrew pronunciation. Frank Goldsmith will teach the
classes and will provide written and recorded materials.
The classes will be taught on five consecutive Sunday evenings beginning on
October 27 and concluding on November 24, from 6:00 to 7:30 pm in the social
hall at CBI. Each student will also be offered an aliyah to chant after
completion of the course. Thus you will have plenty of time to practice before
stepping up to the bima.
To register for the classes, please contact the CBI office, 828-252-8660, or
admin@bethisraelnc.org, by no later than Friday, October 4, so that we will
have time to prepare a sufficient number of materials for the students. Pursuant
to CBI’s policy for adult education events, there is a charge of $18 for CBI
members and $36 for non-members. Checks should be made payable to
Congregation Beth Israel and given to Lee when you register.

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