CBI Events Calendar

Jun
28
Tue
Memory & Forgetting @ CBI
Jun 28 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Torah on Tap:

Memory & Forgetting


Tuesday, June 28, 6:00pm

Archetype Brewery, 174 Broadway St.
We’ll discuss dementia and, more specifically,
Alzheimer’s, looking at the current
research and treatments and
emerging ideas on the subject.
Then we’ll explore how Judaism deals
with the topics of memory and forgetting.

Sharing is caring
Jul
3
Sun
Online Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle
Jul 3 @ 2:30 pm

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infusing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us via Zoom (every Sunday from 2:30pm – 4pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. Please contact Linda Wolf at linda@networktype.com for the online meeting information.

Sharing is caring
Jul
8
Fri
In-person & Online Friday Noon Study Group
Jul 8 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
In-person & Online Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, June 24 12-1  

Last week our group addressed a number of issues brought up in Chapters 7 and 8 in Dara Horn’s People Love Dead Jews.  Among them were
  • The fact that when it comes to anti-Semitic persecution in the world, thinking that America is somehow an exception is a delusion.
  • The role Jews played as a reminder that freedom (of ethnic and religious expression) is possible and that “freedom without responsibility is no freedom at all.”  It was pointed out that this role–in which Jews remain distinct, “despite overwhelming pressure to become like everyone else”–was certainly not exclusive to Jews alone.
  • The fact that in the role identified above, Jews represented a threat to those who fear real freedom and that “societies that accept Jews have flourished and societies that reject Jews have withered.”
  • Horn’s Chapter 8, “On Rescuing Jews and Others,” initially published as a stand-alone pamphlet, is dense; it is hard to find a dominant thesis in the author’s discussion of why she feels uncomfortable with the concept of “righteous gentiles.”
  • Despite Horn’s argument that the number of righteous gentiles is statistically insignificant, over 28,000 of them from 51 countries have been recognized.)  Nonetheless, we tended to agree with Horn that there wasn’t much “kindness of strangers” reflected during the Holocaust.
  • Horn uses Varian Fry to illustrate some of her misgivings about how righteous gentiles functioned.  She’s distressed by the elitism of his project (rescuing “special ones”–artists and intellectuals–while leaving other refugees (e.g. Hasidim and Mitnagdim) to “nearly inevitable murder.”  She indicates that those who were rescued had questionable life-styles despite their “genius.”
This Friday, we will conclude our discussion of Chapter 8 and Horn’s attitudes towards Righteous Gentiles and Varian Fry–with special attention to what Horn identifies as their possible motivation.  We’ll then move on to Chapters 9 (about a digital mapping program that permits viewers to visit lost Jewish Communities) and 10 (about an exhibition on Auschwitz at New York’s Museum of Jewish Heritage).
For supplementary material on Chapter 9, see https://diarna.org/
For supplementary material on Chapter 10, see https://mjhnyc.org/exhibitions/auschwitz/

There will be no Study Group on Friday, July 1 

We will resume our discussions at Noon on Friday, July 8.
Now in its 23rd year, our informal discussion group meets in person from 12-1 in CBI’s small chapel (with an option on Zoom for those who cannot attend in person).  All are welcome to attend regardless of their level of expertise.  Copies of Horn’s collection should be available in local bookstores and through the internet.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.
 

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

 
 

Sharing is caring
Jul
15
Fri
In-person & Online Friday Noon Study Group
Jul 15 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
In-person & Online Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, June 24 12-1  

Last week our group addressed a number of issues brought up in Chapters 7 and 8 in Dara Horn’s People Love Dead Jews.  Among them were
  • The fact that when it comes to anti-Semitic persecution in the world, thinking that America is somehow an exception is a delusion.
  • The role Jews played as a reminder that freedom (of ethnic and religious expression) is possible and that “freedom without responsibility is no freedom at all.”  It was pointed out that this role–in which Jews remain distinct, “despite overwhelming pressure to become like everyone else”–was certainly not exclusive to Jews alone.
  • The fact that in the role identified above, Jews represented a threat to those who fear real freedom and that “societies that accept Jews have flourished and societies that reject Jews have withered.”
  • Horn’s Chapter 8, “On Rescuing Jews and Others,” initially published as a stand-alone pamphlet, is dense; it is hard to find a dominant thesis in the author’s discussion of why she feels uncomfortable with the concept of “righteous gentiles.”
  • Despite Horn’s argument that the number of righteous gentiles is statistically insignificant, over 28,000 of them from 51 countries have been recognized.)  Nonetheless, we tended to agree with Horn that there wasn’t much “kindness of strangers” reflected during the Holocaust.
  • Horn uses Varian Fry to illustrate some of her misgivings about how righteous gentiles functioned.  She’s distressed by the elitism of his project (rescuing “special ones”–artists and intellectuals–while leaving other refugees (e.g. Hasidim and Mitnagdim) to “nearly inevitable murder.”  She indicates that those who were rescued had questionable life-styles despite their “genius.”
This Friday, we will conclude our discussion of Chapter 8 and Horn’s attitudes towards Righteous Gentiles and Varian Fry–with special attention to what Horn identifies as their possible motivation.  We’ll then move on to Chapters 9 (about a digital mapping program that permits viewers to visit lost Jewish Communities) and 10 (about an exhibition on Auschwitz at New York’s Museum of Jewish Heritage).
For supplementary material on Chapter 9, see https://diarna.org/
For supplementary material on Chapter 10, see https://mjhnyc.org/exhibitions/auschwitz/

There will be no Study Group on Friday, July 1 

We will resume our discussions at Noon on Friday, July 8.
Now in its 23rd year, our informal discussion group meets in person from 12-1 in CBI’s small chapel (with an option on Zoom for those who cannot attend in person).  All are welcome to attend regardless of their level of expertise.  Copies of Horn’s collection should be available in local bookstores and through the internet.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.
 

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

 
 

Sharing is caring
Jul
17
Sun
Online Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle
Jul 17 @ 2:30 pm

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infusing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us via Zoom (every Sunday from 2:30pm – 4pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. Please contact Linda Wolf at linda@networktype.com for the online meeting information.

Sharing is caring
Jul
22
Fri
In-person & Online Friday Noon Study Group
Jul 22 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
In-person & Online Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, June 24 12-1  

Last week our group addressed a number of issues brought up in Chapters 7 and 8 in Dara Horn’s People Love Dead Jews.  Among them were
  • The fact that when it comes to anti-Semitic persecution in the world, thinking that America is somehow an exception is a delusion.
  • The role Jews played as a reminder that freedom (of ethnic and religious expression) is possible and that “freedom without responsibility is no freedom at all.”  It was pointed out that this role–in which Jews remain distinct, “despite overwhelming pressure to become like everyone else”–was certainly not exclusive to Jews alone.
  • The fact that in the role identified above, Jews represented a threat to those who fear real freedom and that “societies that accept Jews have flourished and societies that reject Jews have withered.”
  • Horn’s Chapter 8, “On Rescuing Jews and Others,” initially published as a stand-alone pamphlet, is dense; it is hard to find a dominant thesis in the author’s discussion of why she feels uncomfortable with the concept of “righteous gentiles.”
  • Despite Horn’s argument that the number of righteous gentiles is statistically insignificant, over 28,000 of them from 51 countries have been recognized.)  Nonetheless, we tended to agree with Horn that there wasn’t much “kindness of strangers” reflected during the Holocaust.
  • Horn uses Varian Fry to illustrate some of her misgivings about how righteous gentiles functioned.  She’s distressed by the elitism of his project (rescuing “special ones”–artists and intellectuals–while leaving other refugees (e.g. Hasidim and Mitnagdim) to “nearly inevitable murder.”  She indicates that those who were rescued had questionable life-styles despite their “genius.”
This Friday, we will conclude our discussion of Chapter 8 and Horn’s attitudes towards Righteous Gentiles and Varian Fry–with special attention to what Horn identifies as their possible motivation.  We’ll then move on to Chapters 9 (about a digital mapping program that permits viewers to visit lost Jewish Communities) and 10 (about an exhibition on Auschwitz at New York’s Museum of Jewish Heritage).
For supplementary material on Chapter 9, see https://diarna.org/
For supplementary material on Chapter 10, see https://mjhnyc.org/exhibitions/auschwitz/

There will be no Study Group on Friday, July 1 

We will resume our discussions at Noon on Friday, July 8.
Now in its 23rd year, our informal discussion group meets in person from 12-1 in CBI’s small chapel (with an option on Zoom for those who cannot attend in person).  All are welcome to attend regardless of their level of expertise.  Copies of Horn’s collection should be available in local bookstores and through the internet.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.
 

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

 
 

Sharing is caring
Jul
26
Tue
Memory & Forgetting @ CBI
Jul 26 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Torah on Tap:

Memory & Forgetting


Tuesday, June 28, 6:00pm

Archetype Brewery, 174 Broadway St.
We’ll discuss dementia and, more specifically,
Alzheimer’s, looking at the current
research and treatments and
emerging ideas on the subject.
Then we’ll explore how Judaism deals
with the topics of memory and forgetting.

Sharing is caring