CBI Events Calendar

Feb
28
Fri
CX – Friday Noon Study Group
Feb 28 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

February 7, 2020, 12-1

Last week’s we discussed participants’ reactions to televised debates between Rabbi Wolpe and Christopher Hitchens and other atheists.  It’s probably safe to say that no one came away from watching these videos thinking that either side made an airtight argument.  We were particularly interested in the affect displayed by the debaters–Wolpe seeming to be overly affable and Hitchens seeming to be overly arrogant.  We then went on to continue our discussion of Chapter 4 in Rabbi David Wolpe’s Why Faith Matters.  Among the issues discussed were whether the truths of faith endured, unlike the truths of science that often changed; Wolpe’s assurance that God interacts with the world; and Wolpe’s belief that we are partners with God in an on-going process of creating ourselves.

This Friday, we’ll begin with a loose end from Chapter 4, Wolpe’s discomfort with philosopher Thomas Nagel’s saying, “I hope there is no God! I don’t want there to be a God; I don’t want there to be a universe like that” (p. 103).  We’ll then begin discussion of Chapter 5, “What does Religion Really Teach?”  It’s likely that we’ll only get to discuss the first half of this long chapter this week.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Why Faith Matters is available on a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

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Mar
6
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Mar 6 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

February 21, 2020, 12-1

We started our discussion last Friday with discussion of a few loose ends from last week’s discussion of Chapter 5 of Rabbi Wolpe’s Why Faith Matters.  In response to the rabbi’s frequent claims about the superiority of humans to animals (e.g. “. . . we are not merely animals.  We are something greater.”), several of us offered poems, anecdotes, and titles of books (H. is for Hawk, Other Minds, Gifts of the Crow) that suggested that some of our assumptions about the sensibilities of members of the animal kingdom are based on limited knowledge.  Then we addressed Wolpe’s arguments that morality has its origins in God and religion (morality is grounded in “supernatural sanction”; “Goodness arises from fidelity to God”; “Without belief [presumably in God], moral behavior has no set standard”).  Several of us challenged Wolpe’s claims but acknowledged that even a secular upbringing may be based on norms extrapolated from religion.  In response to Wolpe’s claim that religion creates a moral climate that alters . . . the behaviors of believers,” it was asked whether that alteration was always for the good, or whether we should agree with  Arthur C. Clark’s pronouncement that “One of the great tragedies of mankind is that morality has been hijacked by religion.

When we meet this week, we’ll complete discussion of Chapter 5 and then take on Chapters 6 and 7:  “Reading the Bible” and “Is Religion Good for You?”

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Why Faith Matters is available on a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

Please note that the Friday Noon Study Group will not meet on February 28.  We will resume on Friday, March 6, at which time we may conclude our discussion of Why Faith Matters.

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Mar
13
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Mar 13 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

February 21, 2020, 12-1

We started our discussion last Friday with discussion of a few loose ends from last week’s discussion of Chapter 5 of Rabbi Wolpe’s Why Faith Matters.  In response to the rabbi’s frequent claims about the superiority of humans to animals (e.g. “. . . we are not merely animals.  We are something greater.”), several of us offered poems, anecdotes, and titles of books (H. is for Hawk, Other Minds, Gifts of the Crow) that suggested that some of our assumptions about the sensibilities of members of the animal kingdom are based on limited knowledge.  Then we addressed Wolpe’s arguments that morality has its origins in God and religion (morality is grounded in “supernatural sanction”; “Goodness arises from fidelity to God”; “Without belief [presumably in God], moral behavior has no set standard”).  Several of us challenged Wolpe’s claims but acknowledged that even a secular upbringing may be based on norms extrapolated from religion.  In response to Wolpe’s claim that religion creates a moral climate that alters . . . the behaviors of believers,” it was asked whether that alteration was always for the good, or whether we should agree with  Arthur C. Clark’s pronouncement that “One of the great tragedies of mankind is that morality has been hijacked by religion.

When we meet this week, we’ll complete discussion of Chapter 5 and then take on Chapters 6 and 7:  “Reading the Bible” and “Is Religion Good for You?”

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Why Faith Matters is available on a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

Please note that the Friday Noon Study Group will not meet on February 28.  We will resume on Friday, March 6, at which time we may conclude our discussion of Why Faith Matters.

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Mar
17
Tue
GAB – Guided Autobiography Class @ Congregation Beth Israel
Mar 17 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Write and share your stories in a GAB – Guided Autobiography –

Everyone, each and everyone of us, has a story.  This class is designed to help you get organized and pull that story up from your lifetime of memories.  It’s hard to home in on things that truly inform your life perspective.  The GAB method, developed by Dr, James Birren, can help you write your story, two pages at a time, by focusing on themes such as health, money, family and spiritual identity.  Participants share their writings with the other members of the group each week. Finding the story, not evaluating grammar, punctuation, or writing style, is the goal of writing and sharing. Class size is limited to five people.
GAB is a national program with instructors and workshops around the country.
Here is a link to the GAB website: http://guidedautobiography.com
When: Ten Tuesdays beginning March 17 to May 19, 2020 from 1:00 to 3:00.
Where:  CBI Library
Cost:  $150.  Money goes to CBI
Text:  Writing Your Legacy:  The Step-by-Step Guide to Crafting Your Life Story by Richard Campbell and Cheryl Svensson.
Instructor:  Caroline Manheimer – She took the online GAB instructor training class in 2012 with Cheryl Svensson. She found the method and writing prompts helpful and liberating in finding her own story.  Since then She has led Guided Autobiography workshops at the Jewish Community Center, OLLI – Senior Learning Center at UNCA, the Grove Opportunity Center, and at her home. She is a retired librarian and a modestly active fiber artist.
Please feel free to contact her with any questions.
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Mar
20
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Mar 20 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

February 21, 2020, 12-1

We started our discussion last Friday with discussion of a few loose ends from last week’s discussion of Chapter 5 of Rabbi Wolpe’s Why Faith Matters.  In response to the rabbi’s frequent claims about the superiority of humans to animals (e.g. “. . . we are not merely animals.  We are something greater.”), several of us offered poems, anecdotes, and titles of books (H. is for Hawk, Other Minds, Gifts of the Crow) that suggested that some of our assumptions about the sensibilities of members of the animal kingdom are based on limited knowledge.  Then we addressed Wolpe’s arguments that morality has its origins in God and religion (morality is grounded in “supernatural sanction”; “Goodness arises from fidelity to God”; “Without belief [presumably in God], moral behavior has no set standard”).  Several of us challenged Wolpe’s claims but acknowledged that even a secular upbringing may be based on norms extrapolated from religion.  In response to Wolpe’s claim that religion creates a moral climate that alters . . . the behaviors of believers,” it was asked whether that alteration was always for the good, or whether we should agree with  Arthur C. Clark’s pronouncement that “One of the great tragedies of mankind is that morality has been hijacked by religion.

When we meet this week, we’ll complete discussion of Chapter 5 and then take on Chapters 6 and 7:  “Reading the Bible” and “Is Religion Good for You?”

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Why Faith Matters is available on a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

Please note that the Friday Noon Study Group will not meet on February 28.  We will resume on Friday, March 6, at which time we may conclude our discussion of Why Faith Matters.

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Mar
21
Sat
Refugee Shabbat
Mar 21 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

On March 21 CBI’s Social Action Committee will host a special d’var Torah that day with stories of congregant families and how they came to the US.

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Mar
24
Tue
GAB – Guided Autobiography Class @ Congregation Beth Israel
Mar 24 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Write and share your stories in a GAB – Guided Autobiography –

Everyone, each and everyone of us, has a story.  This class is designed to help you get organized and pull that story up from your lifetime of memories.  It’s hard to home in on things that truly inform your life perspective.  The GAB method, developed by Dr, James Birren, can help you write your story, two pages at a time, by focusing on themes such as health, money, family and spiritual identity.  Participants share their writings with the other members of the group each week. Finding the story, not evaluating grammar, punctuation, or writing style, is the goal of writing and sharing. Class size is limited to five people.
GAB is a national program with instructors and workshops around the country.
Here is a link to the GAB website: http://guidedautobiography.com
When: Ten Tuesdays beginning March 17 to May 19, 2020 from 1:00 to 3:00.
Where:  CBI Library
Cost:  $150.  Money goes to CBI
Text:  Writing Your Legacy:  The Step-by-Step Guide to Crafting Your Life Story by Richard Campbell and Cheryl Svensson.
Instructor:  Caroline Manheimer – She took the online GAB instructor training class in 2012 with Cheryl Svensson. She found the method and writing prompts helpful and liberating in finding her own story.  Since then She has led Guided Autobiography workshops at the Jewish Community Center, OLLI – Senior Learning Center at UNCA, the Grove Opportunity Center, and at her home. She is a retired librarian and a modestly active fiber artist.
Please feel free to contact her with any questions.
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