CBI Events Calendar

Jun
18
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Jun 18 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Online Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, June 18, 12-1

Fourteen participants got off to a good start last Friday as we began our examination of Dr. Jodi Magness’s MASADA:   From Jewish Revolt to Modern Myth.  We started this initial session with a consideration of whether the two-thousand-year legend of Masada, as recorded in Josephus’s The Jewish War was trustworthy–or a bit of fake news.
According to the romantic story, in 73 CE to die free rather than live as slaves, the defenders of Masada each killed their own families, and then drew lots to determine who would kill their compatriots. Only two women and five children were supposed to have survived, by hiding.  Archaeologist Yigael Yadin, who led the 1963 excavations of the fortress built by King Herod, felt that the archaeological evidence supported Josephus’ account. However, despite the general acceptance of this account among Israelis as fact, scholars do not all agree.  The truth is that Yadin’s excavations yielded little archaeological material to corroborate, or negate, the account of the siege laid out by Josephus. The finds remain open to interpretation.  And developing our interpretation is what our group will be engaged in during the next several weeks.
We concluded our discussion last week with participants’ sharing their experiences of their visit/s to Masada  (over half of those present had visited this historic site at least once).
This week, we will begin discussion of MASADA:   From Jewish Revolt to Modern Myth in earnest by considering the book’s Acknowledgments, Prologue, and Chapters 1 and 2 (pp ix-38).
Jodi Magness’s book is available for sale on a variety of internet outlets.   Our informal discussion group meets online via Zoom every Friday from 12 – 1.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.  
 
 

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Online Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI
Jun 18 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Online Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

With services unavoidably cancelled, the Ritual Committee is working hard to find ways we can support each other as a community when we can’t be together in person. It’s very distressing to be unable to say Kaddish for a loved one, or to contemplate not sharing a Seder meal with friends and family. We’d like to share with you some plans we have for filling these gaps in our lives.

Please join us for Kabbalat Shabbat services via Zoom.  As long as at least 10 adults log in, we’ll be able to say Kaddish, so please consider attending, even if you’re not a Friday night regular.

You can join the service by going to Our Virtual Community here, then scroll down and click on the blue Kabbalat Shabbat Service button.

If you’d like to borrow a siddur for use at home while services are cancelled, we’ll be happy to lend you one!  Please contact the office for details.

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Jun
20
Sun
Hamsa Papercutting Workshop
Jun 20 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Paper-cut Hamsa Workshop

Sunday, June 20

1:00pm-3:00pm
A hamsa is a stylized hand for protection against the “evil eye,” frequently worn as jewelry.
Made by both Jews and Muslims, hamsas are found all over the Middle East, but are older than
either religion. Come learn about the folklore of hamsas, as we make them out of paper. Learn
the basics of paper-cutting, a traditional Jewish folk art. We will cut out our hamsas with
scissors, and/or Exacto knives for accuracy, then glue them to a background. No artistic talent is
required to make stunning hamsa designs. The finished paper-cut hamsa can be framed, to
hang on the wall. Young people aged 12 and over are welcome.
The workshop lasts for two hours. Fee is $15 payable to CBI.
Bio:
Claire Sherman creates quilts, ceramic sculpture, and Jewish ritual objects out of fabric, paper,
and clay. After graduating from the Rhode Island School of Design, with a BFA in ceramics, she
spent a year in Israel, where she learned about hamsas. She has taught workshops in
paper-cutting, quilting, and Jewish ritual objects for adults and children. Visit her website at
www.claireshermanart.com

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Online Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle
Jun 20 @ 2:30 pm

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infusing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us via Zoom (every Sunday from 2:30pm – 4pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. Please contact Linda Wolf at linda@networktype.com for the online meeting information.

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Jun
25
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Jun 25 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Online Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, June 18, 12-1

Fourteen participants got off to a good start last Friday as we began our examination of Dr. Jodi Magness’s MASADA:   From Jewish Revolt to Modern Myth.  We started this initial session with a consideration of whether the two-thousand-year legend of Masada, as recorded in Josephus’s The Jewish War was trustworthy–or a bit of fake news.
According to the romantic story, in 73 CE to die free rather than live as slaves, the defenders of Masada each killed their own families, and then drew lots to determine who would kill their compatriots. Only two women and five children were supposed to have survived, by hiding.  Archaeologist Yigael Yadin, who led the 1963 excavations of the fortress built by King Herod, felt that the archaeological evidence supported Josephus’ account. However, despite the general acceptance of this account among Israelis as fact, scholars do not all agree.  The truth is that Yadin’s excavations yielded little archaeological material to corroborate, or negate, the account of the siege laid out by Josephus. The finds remain open to interpretation.  And developing our interpretation is what our group will be engaged in during the next several weeks.
We concluded our discussion last week with participants’ sharing their experiences of their visit/s to Masada  (over half of those present had visited this historic site at least once).
This week, we will begin discussion of MASADA:   From Jewish Revolt to Modern Myth in earnest by considering the book’s Acknowledgments, Prologue, and Chapters 1 and 2 (pp ix-38).
Jodi Magness’s book is available for sale on a variety of internet outlets.   Our informal discussion group meets online via Zoom every Friday from 12 – 1.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.  
 
 

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