CBI Events Calendar

Oct
22
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Oct 22 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Online Friday Noon Study Group

Friday October 22, 12-1

Our group continued its close reading from the Book of Genesis, covering Chapter 2:8 through Chapter 3:13.  These verses posed many questions–none of which could be definitively answered–and engendered lots of thoughtful discussion.  Here are some of the issues we talked about:

  • The Garden of Eden and the trees at its center:  the Tree of Life and the Tree of Knowledge.  Were there two trees or only one?  Did the Tree of Knowledge cover all knowledge, A-Z; knowledge of good and evil; sexual knowledge?  Why was humankind forbidden to eat from it?  Did the Tree of  Life confer immortality upon humankind?  Mortality?  Why was this tree guarded by Cherubim following the expulsion of Adam and Eve from Eden?  What are the significances of Eytz Hayyim? 

  • The creation of woman from Adam’s rib/side in response to God’s consideration that it was not good for man to be alone?  Why were all of the animals that Adam named not considered suitable to be his helpmate?  How does this creation of woman story compare to the Talmudic story of Lilith as the first female?  To the Greek legend of Pandora?  To an Indian parable in which man is not satisfied with the woman provided for him?  Does the fact that all these legends were in all probability authored by males slant the message?

  • The story of the temptation of Eve by the serpent.  How did she come to know that the fruit was forbidden to be eaten?  Or touched?  What was the fruit, since it was unlikely that the legendary apple was not a likely candidate?  Figs?  Dates?  Why did Eve eat?  Was the acquisition of knowledge not a good thing?  What did God not want humankind to know?  Did Eve say or do anything to tempt Adam to eat the fruit?  Why did Adam remain silent while the serpent was speaking to Eve?

  • The assignment of blame once God confronts Adam and Eve about their violation of his command?  Adam blames Eve and God.  Eve blames the serpent.

The abundance of questions attests to both the richness and ambiguity of the biblical text and the intellectual curiosity of our group’s participants.

For this coming Friday, we will consider the punishments meted out by God for what Milton called “Man’s first disobedience” and then move on to the story of Cain and Abel (Genesis 3:14-4:26).  We’ll consider Chapter 4 in the context of other legendary fratricides (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fratricide), especially the Roman story of Romulus and Remus (https://en.wikipedia. org/wiki/Romulus_and_Remus). 

Our informal group meets via Zoom every Friday from 12-1. Check the CBI web page for a link.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise.  Please bring whatever copy of the Bible you might have (the more different translations the livelier the discussion).  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu

 

 
 

Sharing is caring
  • 1
    Share
Online Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI
Oct 22 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Online Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

With services unavoidably cancelled, the Ritual Committee is working hard to find ways we can support each other as a community when we can’t be together in person. It’s very distressing to be unable to say Kaddish for a loved one, or to contemplate not sharing a Seder meal with friends and family. We’d like to share with you some plans we have for filling these gaps in our lives.

Please join us for Kabbalat Shabbat services via Zoom.  As long as at least 10 adults log in, we’ll be able to say Kaddish, so please consider attending, even if you’re not a Friday night regular.

You can join the service by going to Our Virtual Community here, then scroll down and click on the blue Kabbalat Shabbat Service button.

If you’d like to borrow a siddur for use at home while services are cancelled, we’ll be happy to lend you one!  Please contact the office for details.

Sharing is caring
Oct
23
Sat
Pre-Service Study Breakfast
Oct 23 @ 9:30 am – 11:30 am

Join us for breakfast and an in-person study session with Rabbi Levine, followed by abbreviated Shabbat morning services.  Please RSVP as you would for any Shabbat morning service by noon of the Friday preceding services.

Sharing is caring
Saturday Morning In-Person and Online Services
Oct 23 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for Shabbat morning services in-person or via Zoom every Saturday morning at 9:30am.

Masks and social distancing are still required for all services that are likely to include singing and chanting.
Masks and social distancing are optional for all smaller, non-singing/chanting gatherings for fully vaccinated individuals.
Unvaccinated adults should always wear a mask.
Beginning with Saturday July 3rd, we will return to holding Shabbat morning services every Shabbat.  You will still be required to register in advance to attend services in the event that contract tracing should become necessary.  You can register online through the Wednesday weekly eblast.  If you’d like to receive the weekly eblast, click here.

Join the Zoom service by going to Our Virtual Community page here, then scroll down and click on the blue Saturday Morning Service button.

Sharing is caring
Oct
29
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Oct 29 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Online Friday Noon Study Group

Friday October 22, 12-1

Our group continued its close reading from the Book of Genesis, covering Chapter 2:8 through Chapter 3:13.  These verses posed many questions–none of which could be definitively answered–and engendered lots of thoughtful discussion.  Here are some of the issues we talked about:

  • The Garden of Eden and the trees at its center:  the Tree of Life and the Tree of Knowledge.  Were there two trees or only one?  Did the Tree of Knowledge cover all knowledge, A-Z; knowledge of good and evil; sexual knowledge?  Why was humankind forbidden to eat from it?  Did the Tree of  Life confer immortality upon humankind?  Mortality?  Why was this tree guarded by Cherubim following the expulsion of Adam and Eve from Eden?  What are the significances of Eytz Hayyim? 

  • The creation of woman from Adam’s rib/side in response to God’s consideration that it was not good for man to be alone?  Why were all of the animals that Adam named not considered suitable to be his helpmate?  How does this creation of woman story compare to the Talmudic story of Lilith as the first female?  To the Greek legend of Pandora?  To an Indian parable in which man is not satisfied with the woman provided for him?  Does the fact that all these legends were in all probability authored by males slant the message?

  • The story of the temptation of Eve by the serpent.  How did she come to know that the fruit was forbidden to be eaten?  Or touched?  What was the fruit, since it was unlikely that the legendary apple was not a likely candidate?  Figs?  Dates?  Why did Eve eat?  Was the acquisition of knowledge not a good thing?  What did God not want humankind to know?  Did Eve say or do anything to tempt Adam to eat the fruit?  Why did Adam remain silent while the serpent was speaking to Eve?

  • The assignment of blame once God confronts Adam and Eve about their violation of his command?  Adam blames Eve and God.  Eve blames the serpent.

The abundance of questions attests to both the richness and ambiguity of the biblical text and the intellectual curiosity of our group’s participants.

For this coming Friday, we will consider the punishments meted out by God for what Milton called “Man’s first disobedience” and then move on to the story of Cain and Abel (Genesis 3:14-4:26).  We’ll consider Chapter 4 in the context of other legendary fratricides (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fratricide), especially the Roman story of Romulus and Remus (https://en.wikipedia. org/wiki/Romulus_and_Remus). 

Our informal group meets via Zoom every Friday from 12-1. Check the CBI web page for a link.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise.  Please bring whatever copy of the Bible you might have (the more different translations the livelier the discussion).  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu

 

 
 

Sharing is caring
  • 1
    Share
Oct
30
Sat
Saturday Morning In-Person and Online Services
Oct 30 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for Shabbat morning services in-person or via Zoom every Saturday morning at 9:30am.

Masks and social distancing are still required for all services that are likely to include singing and chanting.
Masks and social distancing are optional for all smaller, non-singing/chanting gatherings for fully vaccinated individuals.
Unvaccinated adults should always wear a mask.
Beginning with Saturday July 3rd, we will return to holding Shabbat morning services every Shabbat.  You will still be required to register in advance to attend services in the event that contract tracing should become necessary.  You can register online through the Wednesday weekly eblast.  If you’d like to receive the weekly eblast, click here.

Join the Zoom service by going to Our Virtual Community page here, then scroll down and click on the blue Saturday Morning Service button.

Sharing is caring
Oct
31
Sun
Torah on Tap @ CBI
Oct 31 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Torah on Tap @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

This year will be different

We want to change. We do. We each want to be a better version of ourselves today than we were yesterday, especially this time of the year. For some, change comes easily – others not so much. Why? What keeps us from fulfilling the promises we make on Rosh HaShannah, Yom Kippur and New Year’s Eve?

Join us for Torah on Tap this Sunday (4pm – 5:30) as we explore the opportunities and obstacles of change. Share your own story of growth, learn the most common impediments to change and how, with the help of our Jewish traditions, we can re-frame what it means to change – making it easier and more meaningful.

We’ll meet by the stream beside the CBI parking lot. Bring your beverage of choice, a lawn chair and a caring, open mind. Come as you are. Leave different.

 

Sharing is caring