CBI Events Calendar

May
8
Sat
Torah Study with Justin Goldstein
May 8 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Join Justin Goldstein for an hour of Torah study and discussion of the week’s Torah portion.

All are welcome, link to join the Zoom meeting here.

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May
14
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
May 14 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Friday, May 7, 12-1

Last week our discussion group began by considering the practicality of some of the suggested strategies for achieving economic justice that Waskow offers at the conclusion of Chapter 9 of Dancing in God’s Earthquake. Many of us agreed in spirit with some of Waskow’s suggestions (eliminating all dependence on fossil fuels; annulling debts in exchange for commitment to public service; shorter work weeks; bank loans to local enterprises), but we also agreed that implementation of some of these goals would be difficult.
We began our discussion of Chapter 10, about whether war-like kings were ”a blessing or a sin?”, with a consideration of how Waskow’s definitions of God evolved into a ”holy process by which consequences flow from our decisions” and the ”inter-breathing through which humanity creates natural consequences for itself and all life.”  Several of us spoke about how Waskow’s definitions morphed according to his agenda; others had trouble with his consequentialism.  This is a subject that is likely to engender more discussion in our closing weeks.  We also discussed Waskow’s definition of government as an ”institution that possesses a monopoly on the legitimate use of violence.”  Our conversation included acknowledgement of the need for checks any leader’s power–through prophets and other safeguards against autocracy.  This included discussions of some of the ways non-violent resistance to illegitimate uses of power is both sanctioned and modeled in the Biblical text.
This week, we’ll conclude our discussion of Chapter 10 and move on to chapter 11 (about two genocides that are described in the Bible) and Waskow’s Coda and Afterword (pp. 172-198).
 Our informal discussion group is held online every Friday from 12-1.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions.  Dancing in God’s Earthquake can be ordered through a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, or would like the Zoom link, please contact Jay Jacoby at  jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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May
21
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
May 21 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Friday, May 7, 12-1

Last week our discussion group began by considering the practicality of some of the suggested strategies for achieving economic justice that Waskow offers at the conclusion of Chapter 9 of Dancing in God’s Earthquake. Many of us agreed in spirit with some of Waskow’s suggestions (eliminating all dependence on fossil fuels; annulling debts in exchange for commitment to public service; shorter work weeks; bank loans to local enterprises), but we also agreed that implementation of some of these goals would be difficult.
We began our discussion of Chapter 10, about whether war-like kings were ”a blessing or a sin?”, with a consideration of how Waskow’s definitions of God evolved into a ”holy process by which consequences flow from our decisions” and the ”inter-breathing through which humanity creates natural consequences for itself and all life.”  Several of us spoke about how Waskow’s definitions morphed according to his agenda; others had trouble with his consequentialism.  This is a subject that is likely to engender more discussion in our closing weeks.  We also discussed Waskow’s definition of government as an ”institution that possesses a monopoly on the legitimate use of violence.”  Our conversation included acknowledgement of the need for checks any leader’s power–through prophets and other safeguards against autocracy.  This included discussions of some of the ways non-violent resistance to illegitimate uses of power is both sanctioned and modeled in the Biblical text.
This week, we’ll conclude our discussion of Chapter 10 and move on to chapter 11 (about two genocides that are described in the Bible) and Waskow’s Coda and Afterword (pp. 172-198).
 Our informal discussion group is held online every Friday from 12-1.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions.  Dancing in God’s Earthquake can be ordered through a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, or would like the Zoom link, please contact Jay Jacoby at  jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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May
22
Sat
Torah Study with Justin Goldstein
May 22 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Join Justin Goldstein for an hour of Torah study and discussion of the week’s Torah portion.

All are welcome, link to join the Zoom meeting here.

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May
28
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
May 28 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Friday, May 7, 12-1

Last week our discussion group began by considering the practicality of some of the suggested strategies for achieving economic justice that Waskow offers at the conclusion of Chapter 9 of Dancing in God’s Earthquake. Many of us agreed in spirit with some of Waskow’s suggestions (eliminating all dependence on fossil fuels; annulling debts in exchange for commitment to public service; shorter work weeks; bank loans to local enterprises), but we also agreed that implementation of some of these goals would be difficult.
We began our discussion of Chapter 10, about whether war-like kings were ”a blessing or a sin?”, with a consideration of how Waskow’s definitions of God evolved into a ”holy process by which consequences flow from our decisions” and the ”inter-breathing through which humanity creates natural consequences for itself and all life.”  Several of us spoke about how Waskow’s definitions morphed according to his agenda; others had trouble with his consequentialism.  This is a subject that is likely to engender more discussion in our closing weeks.  We also discussed Waskow’s definition of government as an ”institution that possesses a monopoly on the legitimate use of violence.”  Our conversation included acknowledgement of the need for checks any leader’s power–through prophets and other safeguards against autocracy.  This included discussions of some of the ways non-violent resistance to illegitimate uses of power is both sanctioned and modeled in the Biblical text.
This week, we’ll conclude our discussion of Chapter 10 and move on to chapter 11 (about two genocides that are described in the Bible) and Waskow’s Coda and Afterword (pp. 172-198).
 Our informal discussion group is held online every Friday from 12-1.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions.  Dancing in God’s Earthquake can be ordered through a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, or would like the Zoom link, please contact Jay Jacoby at  jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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May
30
Sun
Online Torah on Tap
May 30 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
With so much of CBI’s programming unavoidably cancelled, we’re working hard to find ways we can support each other as a community when we can’t be together in person.

Please join me this Sunday, April 26, at 4:00pm, when we will be holding Torah on Tap via Zoom.

A link to the online discussion group is below.  Zoom is easy to use and will let us see and hear each other as we speak.  If you haven’t already downloaded Zoom to your computer or phone, you must do so before joining the meeting on Sunday at 4:00pm.  You only need to download Zoom once, after that you simply log in, always using the same Meeting ID: 819 7668 2790.  Easy instructions are below this message.

This is a temporary measure to keep us all connected while we can’t be together physically.

Alan Silverman

Torah on Tap Host

Instructions for Downloading Zoom

The first time you ever use Zoom on a computer, do the following:

Go to https://zoom.us
Hover over (don’t click) “RESOURCES” on the top right and then click “Download Zoom Client” from the drop-down menu that appears
Click “Download” under “Zoom Client for Meetings”
If it asks you to allow it to download “zoom.us”, click “Allow” or “Yes”
Open the downloaded file and follow the instructions to install Zoom on your computer

The first time you ever use Zoom on a smart phone, do the following:
Go to the App Store and find “Zoom Cloud Meetings” and download it (it is free)

Instructions for attending Torah on Tap on CBI’s Zoom Account:

Right before the start of services, either go to https://zoom.us on your computer or open your Zoom app on your smartphone
Click “Join a Meeting”
Type in this Meeting ID: 819 7668 2790 and click “Join”
If you’re using the computer and Zoom asks you to allow it to open “zoom.us”, click “Allow” or “Yes” or “Open” and then click “Join With Computer Audio”
If you’re using a smart phone and Zoom asks you to allow using the microphone/camera, allow it
If it says “Waiting for the host to start this meeting”, just wait a few minutes for Alan to start the meeting

Join us on the last Sunday of the month online for a refreshing and often provocative discussion. Each month, we take on a new topic – often ripped from the headlines of today’s news. We spend the first 45 minutes wrapping our arms around it, defining it, dissecting and analyzing it from various viewpoints. Then we spend the rest of the time discussing it from Judaism’s point of view.

  • What’s Judaism’s take on universal healthcare?
  • Would Moses walk the streets of Chicago today packing heat?
  • Is it okay to punch a white supremacist?

Torah on Tap gives us a chance to learn, vent, share and, most of all, understand what 4,000 years of cultural development, debate and dialogue has to say about some of the issues that confront us today. Torah on Tap is free and open to all. Varying viewpoints are not only welcome, but encouraged.

See you there!

 

 

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Jun
4
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Jun 4 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Friday, May 7, 12-1

Last week our discussion group began by considering the practicality of some of the suggested strategies for achieving economic justice that Waskow offers at the conclusion of Chapter 9 of Dancing in God’s Earthquake. Many of us agreed in spirit with some of Waskow’s suggestions (eliminating all dependence on fossil fuels; annulling debts in exchange for commitment to public service; shorter work weeks; bank loans to local enterprises), but we also agreed that implementation of some of these goals would be difficult.
We began our discussion of Chapter 10, about whether war-like kings were ”a blessing or a sin?”, with a consideration of how Waskow’s definitions of God evolved into a ”holy process by which consequences flow from our decisions” and the ”inter-breathing through which humanity creates natural consequences for itself and all life.”  Several of us spoke about how Waskow’s definitions morphed according to his agenda; others had trouble with his consequentialism.  This is a subject that is likely to engender more discussion in our closing weeks.  We also discussed Waskow’s definition of government as an ”institution that possesses a monopoly on the legitimate use of violence.”  Our conversation included acknowledgement of the need for checks any leader’s power–through prophets and other safeguards against autocracy.  This included discussions of some of the ways non-violent resistance to illegitimate uses of power is both sanctioned and modeled in the Biblical text.
This week, we’ll conclude our discussion of Chapter 10 and move on to chapter 11 (about two genocides that are described in the Bible) and Waskow’s Coda and Afterword (pp. 172-198).
 Our informal discussion group is held online every Friday from 12-1.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions.  Dancing in God’s Earthquake can be ordered through a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, or would like the Zoom link, please contact Jay Jacoby at  jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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