CBI Events Calendar

Jul
25
Sun
Online Torah on Tap
Jul 25 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Online Torah on Tap @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

“When Wisdom Becomes Disposable: The Reality of Elder Care in America”

Sunday, July 25, 4:00pm at the CBI fire pit

From the products we buy to our relationships, we live in a disposable society. What we throw out says a lot about who we are. Our elder population is no exception. As the Baby-Boomer generation ages, the instance of elder abuse and neglect is rising, including here in Asheville and across the Jewish community. Join the Torah on Tap gang as we unpack an issue that, eventually,  affects us all. We are especially reaching out to teens and those who still have their grandparents to join us. Our special guest facilitator for the first half of the session will be Ali Climo.

You’re welcome to bring your beverage of choice and please bring a lawn chair as well. Look forward to seeing you.

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Aug
1
Sun
Online Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle
Aug 1 @ 2:30 pm

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infusing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us via Zoom (every Sunday from 2:30pm – 4pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. Please contact Linda Wolf at linda@networktype.com for the online meeting information.

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Aug
6
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Aug 6 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Our study group will not meet on July 23 or July 30 

Last week we completed our discussion of Jodi Magness’s Masada with a consideration of Chapter 9, which covered ”Yigael Yadin, the Mass Suicide, and the Masada Myth.”  We began by addressing the question of who occupied Masada from 66-73 CE and what happened to those occupants?  Needless to say, our responses were mixed.  Were the occupants 1) refugees from Roman oppression? 2) heroic freedom-fighting rebels standing up against Roman rule3) Zealots aiming towards a world Jewish theocracy who not only fought against the Romans but also terrorized other Jews who did not conform to the Zealots’ standards?
In our discussion, we considered comparisons that might be drawn between those who participated in what Magness called ”The Rebel Occupation of Masada” and those American colonists who opposed British rule in the 18th century, members of the Confedrate States in the 19th century, and those who identify as Al Qaida, Hamas, or the Taliban in our own century.  As to what happened to these occupants, we were not unanimous in accepting Josephus’s account of Mass Suicide, or of Yadin’s archeological corroboration of that account.  Josephus’s history was not based on first-hand observation; it may have been more of a literary work than an objective hiustorical document; it may have been written to placate those who patronized its author.  Alternate explanations exist for some of the assumptions made by Yadin.  Ceramic fragments may have contained names of those participating in a lottery relating to how occupants took their own lives, or they could have been labels for differentiating ownership of various food stores.
Our major takeaways from our recent study of Masada, were that 1) history and archaeology are not definitive, we should read them with a certain amount of skepticism, and 2) that both history and archaeology can be used in the service of mythmaking, serving the needs of their authors and audiences.  In the case of Masada, we cannot definitively rule out the accounts given by Josephus or Yadin, but we should consider how those accounts served to placate Josephus’s Jewish peers and Roman patrons or Yadin’s efforts to construct a new identity for Israeli Jews following the Holocaust and the establishment of the state of Israel.

 We will resume on Friday, August 6, with a new topic,

Hasia Diner’s biography of Julius Rosenwald, CEO of Sears, Roebuck and noted Jewish philanthropist who helped to establish over 5,000 schools for African-American children throughout the American South.  Diner’s book, Julius Rosenwald: Repairing the World, Yale University Press, 2017, is available on a number of internet outlets.  Check this website in a few weeks for more details.

Our informal discussion group meets online via Zoom every Friday from 12 – 1.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.  
 
 

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Aug
13
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Aug 13 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Our study group will not meet on July 23 or July 30 

Last week we completed our discussion of Jodi Magness’s Masada with a consideration of Chapter 9, which covered ”Yigael Yadin, the Mass Suicide, and the Masada Myth.”  We began by addressing the question of who occupied Masada from 66-73 CE and what happened to those occupants?  Needless to say, our responses were mixed.  Were the occupants 1) refugees from Roman oppression? 2) heroic freedom-fighting rebels standing up against Roman rule3) Zealots aiming towards a world Jewish theocracy who not only fought against the Romans but also terrorized other Jews who did not conform to the Zealots’ standards?
In our discussion, we considered comparisons that might be drawn between those who participated in what Magness called ”The Rebel Occupation of Masada” and those American colonists who opposed British rule in the 18th century, members of the Confedrate States in the 19th century, and those who identify as Al Qaida, Hamas, or the Taliban in our own century.  As to what happened to these occupants, we were not unanimous in accepting Josephus’s account of Mass Suicide, or of Yadin’s archeological corroboration of that account.  Josephus’s history was not based on first-hand observation; it may have been more of a literary work than an objective hiustorical document; it may have been written to placate those who patronized its author.  Alternate explanations exist for some of the assumptions made by Yadin.  Ceramic fragments may have contained names of those participating in a lottery relating to how occupants took their own lives, or they could have been labels for differentiating ownership of various food stores.
Our major takeaways from our recent study of Masada, were that 1) history and archaeology are not definitive, we should read them with a certain amount of skepticism, and 2) that both history and archaeology can be used in the service of mythmaking, serving the needs of their authors and audiences.  In the case of Masada, we cannot definitively rule out the accounts given by Josephus or Yadin, but we should consider how those accounts served to placate Josephus’s Jewish peers and Roman patrons or Yadin’s efforts to construct a new identity for Israeli Jews following the Holocaust and the establishment of the state of Israel.

 We will resume on Friday, August 6, with a new topic,

Hasia Diner’s biography of Julius Rosenwald, CEO of Sears, Roebuck and noted Jewish philanthropist who helped to establish over 5,000 schools for African-American children throughout the American South.  Diner’s book, Julius Rosenwald: Repairing the World, Yale University Press, 2017, is available on a number of internet outlets.  Check this website in a few weeks for more details.

Our informal discussion group meets online via Zoom every Friday from 12 – 1.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.  
 
 

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Aug
15
Sun
Online Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle
Aug 15 @ 2:30 pm

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infusing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us via Zoom (every Sunday from 2:30pm – 4pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. Please contact Linda Wolf at linda@networktype.com for the online meeting information.

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Aug
17
Tue
From the White House to the Sea: A Calligrapher’s Journey
Aug 17 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

All are invited to attend a free presentation highlighting stories and art from the studio of former White House calligrapher Rick Paulus at Congregation Beth Israel on Tuesday, August 17, at 5:30pm.

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Aug
20
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Aug 20 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Our study group will not meet on July 23 or July 30 

Last week we completed our discussion of Jodi Magness’s Masada with a consideration of Chapter 9, which covered ”Yigael Yadin, the Mass Suicide, and the Masada Myth.”  We began by addressing the question of who occupied Masada from 66-73 CE and what happened to those occupants?  Needless to say, our responses were mixed.  Were the occupants 1) refugees from Roman oppression? 2) heroic freedom-fighting rebels standing up against Roman rule3) Zealots aiming towards a world Jewish theocracy who not only fought against the Romans but also terrorized other Jews who did not conform to the Zealots’ standards?
In our discussion, we considered comparisons that might be drawn between those who participated in what Magness called ”The Rebel Occupation of Masada” and those American colonists who opposed British rule in the 18th century, members of the Confedrate States in the 19th century, and those who identify as Al Qaida, Hamas, or the Taliban in our own century.  As to what happened to these occupants, we were not unanimous in accepting Josephus’s account of Mass Suicide, or of Yadin’s archeological corroboration of that account.  Josephus’s history was not based on first-hand observation; it may have been more of a literary work than an objective hiustorical document; it may have been written to placate those who patronized its author.  Alternate explanations exist for some of the assumptions made by Yadin.  Ceramic fragments may have contained names of those participating in a lottery relating to how occupants took their own lives, or they could have been labels for differentiating ownership of various food stores.
Our major takeaways from our recent study of Masada, were that 1) history and archaeology are not definitive, we should read them with a certain amount of skepticism, and 2) that both history and archaeology can be used in the service of mythmaking, serving the needs of their authors and audiences.  In the case of Masada, we cannot definitively rule out the accounts given by Josephus or Yadin, but we should consider how those accounts served to placate Josephus’s Jewish peers and Roman patrons or Yadin’s efforts to construct a new identity for Israeli Jews following the Holocaust and the establishment of the state of Israel.

 We will resume on Friday, August 6, with a new topic,

Hasia Diner’s biography of Julius Rosenwald, CEO of Sears, Roebuck and noted Jewish philanthropist who helped to establish over 5,000 schools for African-American children throughout the American South.  Diner’s book, Julius Rosenwald: Repairing the World, Yale University Press, 2017, is available on a number of internet outlets.  Check this website in a few weeks for more details.

Our informal discussion group meets online via Zoom every Friday from 12 – 1.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.  
 
 

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