CBI Events Calendar

Jun
4
Tue
Exec Committee Meeting
Jun 4 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
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Jun
5
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Jun 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Meet the Midrash is for those who want to make the regular study of the weekly Torah portion a part of their fixed practice.

Join Rabbi Goldstein each Wednesday around noon for a traditional interpretation of the Sages on the upcoming Torah portion or upcoming holidays.

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Jun
7
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Jun 7 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, August 30, 12:00-1:00 

Twenty participants were on board for our inaugural voyage into Rabbi Jonathan Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World:  The Ethics of Responsibility.  Before getting to the book, we briefly discussed a handout offering information on Rabbi Sacks’s life and works.  We also watched and talked about a ten-minute TED talk Sacks had given in Vancouver–one that centered on ethics of responsibility. 
In his talk Sacks stressed the need to turn our attention away from ourselves and towards others (find and replace self-help, self-satisfaction, etc. with other-help, other-satisfaction).  He also suggested that we avoid the idealism of political extremes (those on the right who long for returning to a world that never was, and those on the left who dream of establishing a world that will never be).  We discussed how idealistic Rabbi Sacks’s agenda may be–a subject I’m sure we’ll return to in the coming weeks. 
We then discussed a few issues presented in the opening pages of Chapter 1.  Among the ideas we talked about were 1) Sacks’s claim that “Life is God’s call to responsibility” (Can we have that calling without God?); 2) Using God as a role model–Imitatio Dei–by exercising kindness, justice, and righteousness (Are their other aspects of the God we encounter in scripture that are less worthy of imitation?); and 3) Subscribing to the notion that the desire to give should be stronger than the desire to have (how realistic is this expectation?).
 For our session this week, we’ll look at the first three chapters of Part I of Rabbi Sacks’s book:  “The Ethics of Responsibility,” “Faith as Protest,” and “Charity as Justice.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

 

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Jun
8
Sat
Tikkun Leil Shavuot 5779
Jun 8 @ 8:00 pm – Jun 9 @ 4:30 am

Join Rabbi Batsheva Meiri and Rabbi Justin Goldstein in an all-night study on the concept of Truth in Jewish wisdom.

In an era of rapid information exchange, truth is seeming harder and harder to define. Through ethical, spiritual, and mystical dynamics we will explore the concept of emet, and how it might influence our understanding of truth.

Bring desserts and snacks to share. Coffee provided.

 

 

 

8pm-9pm – contemplative, poetic study with Rabbi Batsheva Meiri and Dr. Richard Chess

9pm – Havdallah and Food

9:30pm – all-night learning with Rabbi Justin Goldstein

 

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Jun
9
Sun
Shavuot Morning Services
Jun 9 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm
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Jun
10
Mon
Shavuot Morning Services
Jun 10 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm
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Jun
12
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Jun 12 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Meet the Midrash is for those who want to make the regular study of the weekly Torah portion a part of their fixed practice.

Join Rabbi Goldstein each Wednesday around noon for a traditional interpretation of the Sages on the upcoming Torah portion or upcoming holidays.

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Jun
14
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Jun 14 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, August 30, 12:00-1:00 

Twenty participants were on board for our inaugural voyage into Rabbi Jonathan Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World:  The Ethics of Responsibility.  Before getting to the book, we briefly discussed a handout offering information on Rabbi Sacks’s life and works.  We also watched and talked about a ten-minute TED talk Sacks had given in Vancouver–one that centered on ethics of responsibility. 
In his talk Sacks stressed the need to turn our attention away from ourselves and towards others (find and replace self-help, self-satisfaction, etc. with other-help, other-satisfaction).  He also suggested that we avoid the idealism of political extremes (those on the right who long for returning to a world that never was, and those on the left who dream of establishing a world that will never be).  We discussed how idealistic Rabbi Sacks’s agenda may be–a subject I’m sure we’ll return to in the coming weeks. 
We then discussed a few issues presented in the opening pages of Chapter 1.  Among the ideas we talked about were 1) Sacks’s claim that “Life is God’s call to responsibility” (Can we have that calling without God?); 2) Using God as a role model–Imitatio Dei–by exercising kindness, justice, and righteousness (Are their other aspects of the God we encounter in scripture that are less worthy of imitation?); and 3) Subscribing to the notion that the desire to give should be stronger than the desire to have (how realistic is this expectation?).
 For our session this week, we’ll look at the first three chapters of Part I of Rabbi Sacks’s book:  “The Ethics of Responsibility,” “Faith as Protest,” and “Charity as Justice.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

 

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Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI
Jun 14 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Join us in welcoming Shabbat with prayer and song.

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Jun
15
Sat
Shabbat Morning Services @ CBI
Jun 15 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for a participatory, high-energy Shabbat service, sure to inspire, uplift, educate and engage. Be sure to hang around for food and schmoozing at our Kiddish lunch.

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Jun
16
Sun
Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle will not meet in August @ Congregation Beth HaTephila
Jun 16 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle will not meet in August @ Congregation Beth HaTephila | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infuing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us (usually) on the first and third Sunday of each month from 1pm – 3pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. Congregation Beth Ha Tephila, 43 North Libery Street in North Asheville.

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Jun
21
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Jun 21 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, August 30, 12:00-1:00 

Twenty participants were on board for our inaugural voyage into Rabbi Jonathan Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World:  The Ethics of Responsibility.  Before getting to the book, we briefly discussed a handout offering information on Rabbi Sacks’s life and works.  We also watched and talked about a ten-minute TED talk Sacks had given in Vancouver–one that centered on ethics of responsibility. 
In his talk Sacks stressed the need to turn our attention away from ourselves and towards others (find and replace self-help, self-satisfaction, etc. with other-help, other-satisfaction).  He also suggested that we avoid the idealism of political extremes (those on the right who long for returning to a world that never was, and those on the left who dream of establishing a world that will never be).  We discussed how idealistic Rabbi Sacks’s agenda may be–a subject I’m sure we’ll return to in the coming weeks. 
We then discussed a few issues presented in the opening pages of Chapter 1.  Among the ideas we talked about were 1) Sacks’s claim that “Life is God’s call to responsibility” (Can we have that calling without God?); 2) Using God as a role model–Imitatio Dei–by exercising kindness, justice, and righteousness (Are their other aspects of the God we encounter in scripture that are less worthy of imitation?); and 3) Subscribing to the notion that the desire to give should be stronger than the desire to have (how realistic is this expectation?).
 For our session this week, we’ll look at the first three chapters of Part I of Rabbi Sacks’s book:  “The Ethics of Responsibility,” “Faith as Protest,” and “Charity as Justice.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

 

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Jun
22
Sat
Shabbat Morning Services @ CBI
Jun 22 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for a participatory, high-energy Shabbat service, sure to inspire, uplift, educate and engage. Be sure to hang around for food and schmoozing at our Kiddish lunch.

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Jun
23
Sun
Dinner & a Movie: Russian Jews
Jun 23 @ 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Join us for the final segment of this 3-film documentary on the Jews of Russia.  Each film stands alone – there’s no need to have seen the previous two films.

We’ll begin with a vegetarian potluck meal at 6:00pm in the CBI social hall followed by the film at 7:00pm.  There will be an opportunity for discussion following the film for those who are interested.

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Jun
27
Thu
Morning Minyan with Camp Ramah Darom
Jun 27 @ 8:00 am – 8:45 am
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Jun
28
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Jun 28 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, August 30, 12:00-1:00 

Twenty participants were on board for our inaugural voyage into Rabbi Jonathan Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World:  The Ethics of Responsibility.  Before getting to the book, we briefly discussed a handout offering information on Rabbi Sacks’s life and works.  We also watched and talked about a ten-minute TED talk Sacks had given in Vancouver–one that centered on ethics of responsibility. 
In his talk Sacks stressed the need to turn our attention away from ourselves and towards others (find and replace self-help, self-satisfaction, etc. with other-help, other-satisfaction).  He also suggested that we avoid the idealism of political extremes (those on the right who long for returning to a world that never was, and those on the left who dream of establishing a world that will never be).  We discussed how idealistic Rabbi Sacks’s agenda may be–a subject I’m sure we’ll return to in the coming weeks. 
We then discussed a few issues presented in the opening pages of Chapter 1.  Among the ideas we talked about were 1) Sacks’s claim that “Life is God’s call to responsibility” (Can we have that calling without God?); 2) Using God as a role model–Imitatio Dei–by exercising kindness, justice, and righteousness (Are their other aspects of the God we encounter in scripture that are less worthy of imitation?); and 3) Subscribing to the notion that the desire to give should be stronger than the desire to have (how realistic is this expectation?).
 For our session this week, we’ll look at the first three chapters of Part I of Rabbi Sacks’s book:  “The Ethics of Responsibility,” “Faith as Protest,” and “Charity as Justice.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

 

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Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI
Jun 28 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Join CBI families and kids, members and visitors of all ages as we come together to welcome Shabbat with prayer, song and inspiration.

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Jun
29
Sat
Shabbat Morning Services @ CBI
Jun 29 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for a participatory, high-energy Shabbat service, sure to inspire, uplift, educate and engage. Be sure to hang around for food and schmoozing at our Kiddish lunch.

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Hasidishe Kiddush
Jun 29 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Hasidishe Kiddush

Warm your heart and soul with Torah (and schnapps…) and join together to learn Hasidic thought and wisdom on parashat ha’shavu’a, the weekly Torah portion. We’ll meet on the last Shabbat of each month, at 12:30 pm in the small sanctuary.  All are welcome.

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Jun
30
Sun
Torah on Tap @ Archetype Brewing
Jun 30 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Torah on Tap @ Archetype Brewing | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Join us on the last Sunday of the month at Archetype Brewing (dowtown north) for a refreshing and often provocative discussion over a pint (or two) of great brew. Each month, we take on a new topic – often ripped from the headlines of today’s news. We spend the first 45 minutes wrapping our arms around it, defining it, dissecting and analyzing it from various viewpoints. Then we spend the rest of the time discussing it from Judaism’s point of view.

  • What’s Judaism’s take on universal healthcare?
  • Would Moses walk the streets of Chicago today packing heat?
  • Is it okay to punch a white supremacist?

Torah on Tap gives us a chance to learn, vent, share and, most of all, understand what 4,000 years of cultural development, debate and dialogue has to say about some of the issues that confront us today. Torah on Tap is free and open to all. Varying viewpoints are not only welcome, but encouraged.

In addition to drinks, Archetype also offers small, locally-made bites available for purchase, including Poppy Popcorn, Asheville Pretzel Company pretzels, and Hickory Nut Gap Farm meat sticks. Plenty of parking in the rear.

See you there!

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Jul
3
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Jul 3 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Meet the Midrash is for those who want to make the regular study of the weekly Torah portion a part of their fixed practice.

Join Rabbi Goldstein each Wednesday around noon for a traditional interpretation of the Sages on the upcoming Torah portion or upcoming holidays.

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Jul
5
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Jul 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, August 30, 12:00-1:00 

Twenty participants were on board for our inaugural voyage into Rabbi Jonathan Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World:  The Ethics of Responsibility.  Before getting to the book, we briefly discussed a handout offering information on Rabbi Sacks’s life and works.  We also watched and talked about a ten-minute TED talk Sacks had given in Vancouver–one that centered on ethics of responsibility. 
In his talk Sacks stressed the need to turn our attention away from ourselves and towards others (find and replace self-help, self-satisfaction, etc. with other-help, other-satisfaction).  He also suggested that we avoid the idealism of political extremes (those on the right who long for returning to a world that never was, and those on the left who dream of establishing a world that will never be).  We discussed how idealistic Rabbi Sacks’s agenda may be–a subject I’m sure we’ll return to in the coming weeks. 
We then discussed a few issues presented in the opening pages of Chapter 1.  Among the ideas we talked about were 1) Sacks’s claim that “Life is God’s call to responsibility” (Can we have that calling without God?); 2) Using God as a role model–Imitatio Dei–by exercising kindness, justice, and righteousness (Are their other aspects of the God we encounter in scripture that are less worthy of imitation?); and 3) Subscribing to the notion that the desire to give should be stronger than the desire to have (how realistic is this expectation?).
 For our session this week, we’ll look at the first three chapters of Part I of Rabbi Sacks’s book:  “The Ethics of Responsibility,” “Faith as Protest,” and “Charity as Justice.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

 

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Jul
6
Sat
Shabbat Morning Services @ CBI
Jul 6 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for a participatory, high-energy Shabbat service, sure to inspire, uplift, educate and engage. Be sure to hang around for food and schmoozing at our Kiddish lunch.

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Jul
10
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Jul 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Meet the Midrash is for those who want to make the regular study of the weekly Torah portion a part of their fixed practice.

Join Rabbi Goldstein each Wednesday around noon for a traditional interpretation of the Sages on the upcoming Torah portion or upcoming holidays.

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Jul
11
Thu
CBI Board meeting
Jul 11 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
CBI Board meeting
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Jul
12
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Jul 12 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, August 30, 12:00-1:00 

Twenty participants were on board for our inaugural voyage into Rabbi Jonathan Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World:  The Ethics of Responsibility.  Before getting to the book, we briefly discussed a handout offering information on Rabbi Sacks’s life and works.  We also watched and talked about a ten-minute TED talk Sacks had given in Vancouver–one that centered on ethics of responsibility. 
In his talk Sacks stressed the need to turn our attention away from ourselves and towards others (find and replace self-help, self-satisfaction, etc. with other-help, other-satisfaction).  He also suggested that we avoid the idealism of political extremes (those on the right who long for returning to a world that never was, and those on the left who dream of establishing a world that will never be).  We discussed how idealistic Rabbi Sacks’s agenda may be–a subject I’m sure we’ll return to in the coming weeks. 
We then discussed a few issues presented in the opening pages of Chapter 1.  Among the ideas we talked about were 1) Sacks’s claim that “Life is God’s call to responsibility” (Can we have that calling without God?); 2) Using God as a role model–Imitatio Dei–by exercising kindness, justice, and righteousness (Are their other aspects of the God we encounter in scripture that are less worthy of imitation?); and 3) Subscribing to the notion that the desire to give should be stronger than the desire to have (how realistic is this expectation?).
 For our session this week, we’ll look at the first three chapters of Part I of Rabbi Sacks’s book:  “The Ethics of Responsibility,” “Faith as Protest,” and “Charity as Justice.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

 

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Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI
Jul 12 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Join us in welcoming Shabbat with prayer and song.

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Jul
13
Sat
Shabbat Morning Services @ CBI
Jul 13 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for a participatory, high-energy Shabbat service, sure to inspire, uplift, educate and engage. Be sure to hang around for food and schmoozing at our Kiddish lunch.

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Jul
17
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Jul 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Meet the Midrash is for those who want to make the regular study of the weekly Torah portion a part of their fixed practice.

Join Rabbi Goldstein each Wednesday around noon for a traditional interpretation of the Sages on the upcoming Torah portion or upcoming holidays.

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Jul
19
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Jul 19 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, August 30, 12:00-1:00 

Twenty participants were on board for our inaugural voyage into Rabbi Jonathan Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World:  The Ethics of Responsibility.  Before getting to the book, we briefly discussed a handout offering information on Rabbi Sacks’s life and works.  We also watched and talked about a ten-minute TED talk Sacks had given in Vancouver–one that centered on ethics of responsibility. 
In his talk Sacks stressed the need to turn our attention away from ourselves and towards others (find and replace self-help, self-satisfaction, etc. with other-help, other-satisfaction).  He also suggested that we avoid the idealism of political extremes (those on the right who long for returning to a world that never was, and those on the left who dream of establishing a world that will never be).  We discussed how idealistic Rabbi Sacks’s agenda may be–a subject I’m sure we’ll return to in the coming weeks. 
We then discussed a few issues presented in the opening pages of Chapter 1.  Among the ideas we talked about were 1) Sacks’s claim that “Life is God’s call to responsibility” (Can we have that calling without God?); 2) Using God as a role model–Imitatio Dei–by exercising kindness, justice, and righteousness (Are their other aspects of the God we encounter in scripture that are less worthy of imitation?); and 3) Subscribing to the notion that the desire to give should be stronger than the desire to have (how realistic is this expectation?).
 For our session this week, we’ll look at the first three chapters of Part I of Rabbi Sacks’s book:  “The Ethics of Responsibility,” “Faith as Protest,” and “Charity as Justice.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

 

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Jul
20
Sat
Shabbat Morning Services @ CBI
Jul 20 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for a participatory, high-energy Shabbat service, sure to inspire, uplift, educate and engage. Be sure to hang around for food and schmoozing at our Kiddish lunch.

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Jul
21
Sun
Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle will not meet in August @ Congregation Beth HaTephila
Jul 21 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle will not meet in August @ Congregation Beth HaTephila | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infuing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us (usually) on the first and third Sunday of each month from 1pm – 3pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. Congregation Beth Ha Tephila, 43 North Libery Street in North Asheville.

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Sonja Hruska Celebration of Life
Jul 21 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Celebration of life for Sonja Hruska
at Leon and Carole’s home on Sunday
July 21st from 1-3 pm
Open house
Cosmos and desserts and appetizers
Feel free to bring a dish to share

18 N Kensington Road
Asheville NC 28804
828 337-9961
Road is narrow
Parking on one side of road only
Please do not block traffic

Please bring printed photos for a display. The photos will be returned.

Please bring stories to share publicly about Sonja that recall her amazing personality and character.

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Jul
24
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Jul 24 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Meet the Midrash is for those who want to make the regular study of the weekly Torah portion a part of their fixed practice.

Join Rabbi Goldstein each Wednesday around noon for a traditional interpretation of the Sages on the upcoming Torah portion or upcoming holidays.

Sharing is caring
Jul
26
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Jul 26 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, August 30, 12:00-1:00 

Twenty participants were on board for our inaugural voyage into Rabbi Jonathan Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World:  The Ethics of Responsibility.  Before getting to the book, we briefly discussed a handout offering information on Rabbi Sacks’s life and works.  We also watched and talked about a ten-minute TED talk Sacks had given in Vancouver–one that centered on ethics of responsibility. 
In his talk Sacks stressed the need to turn our attention away from ourselves and towards others (find and replace self-help, self-satisfaction, etc. with other-help, other-satisfaction).  He also suggested that we avoid the idealism of political extremes (those on the right who long for returning to a world that never was, and those on the left who dream of establishing a world that will never be).  We discussed how idealistic Rabbi Sacks’s agenda may be–a subject I’m sure we’ll return to in the coming weeks. 
We then discussed a few issues presented in the opening pages of Chapter 1.  Among the ideas we talked about were 1) Sacks’s claim that “Life is God’s call to responsibility” (Can we have that calling without God?); 2) Using God as a role model–Imitatio Dei–by exercising kindness, justice, and righteousness (Are their other aspects of the God we encounter in scripture that are less worthy of imitation?); and 3) Subscribing to the notion that the desire to give should be stronger than the desire to have (how realistic is this expectation?).
 For our session this week, we’ll look at the first three chapters of Part I of Rabbi Sacks’s book:  “The Ethics of Responsibility,” “Faith as Protest,” and “Charity as Justice.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

 

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Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI
Jul 26 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Join CBI families and kids, members and visitors of all ages as we come together to welcome Shabbat with prayer, song and inspiration.

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Jul
27
Sat
Shabbat Morning Services @ CBI
Jul 27 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for a participatory, high-energy Shabbat service, sure to inspire, uplift, educate and engage. Be sure to hang around for food and schmoozing at our Kiddish lunch.

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Hasidishe Kiddush
Jul 27 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Hasidishe Kiddush

Warm your heart and soul with Torah (and schnapps…) and join together to learn Hasidic thought and wisdom on parashat ha’shavu’a, the weekly Torah portion. We’ll meet on the last Shabbat of each month, at 12:30 pm in the small sanctuary.  All are welcome.

Sharing is caring
Jul
28
Sun
Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle at CBI
Jul 28 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infusing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us (usually) on the first and third Sunday of each month from 1pm – 3pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. Congregation Beth Ha Tephila, 43 North Liberty Street in North Asheville.

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Torah on Tap @ Archetype Brewing
Jul 28 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Torah on Tap @ Archetype Brewing | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Join us on the last Sunday of the month at Archetype Brewing (dowtown north) for a refreshing and often provocative discussion over a pint (or two) of great brew. Each month, we take on a new topic – often ripped from the headlines of today’s news. We spend the first 45 minutes wrapping our arms around it, defining it, dissecting and analyzing it from various viewpoints. Then we spend the rest of the time discussing it from Judaism’s point of view.

  • What’s Judaism’s take on universal healthcare?
  • Would Moses walk the streets of Chicago today packing heat?
  • Is it okay to punch a white supremacist?

Torah on Tap gives us a chance to learn, vent, share and, most of all, understand what 4,000 years of cultural development, debate and dialogue has to say about some of the issues that confront us today. Torah on Tap is free and open to all. Varying viewpoints are not only welcome, but encouraged.

In addition to drinks, Archetype also offers small, locally-made bites available for purchase, including Poppy Popcorn, Asheville Pretzel Company pretzels, and Hickory Nut Gap Farm meat sticks. Plenty of parking in the rear.

See you there!

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