CBI Events Calendar

Oct
21
Mon
Shemini Atzeret morning services
Oct 21 @ 9:30 am – 12:15 pm
Erev Simhat Torah Vegetarian potluck & services
Oct 21 @ 6:00 pm – 7:15 pm

Join us for a vegetarian potluck meal followed by Erev Simhat Torah (Rejoicing in the Torah) holiday services.

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Oct
22
Tue
Simhat Torah Morning Services
Oct 22 @ 9:30 am – 12:15 pm
Oct
25
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Oct 25 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

August 7, 2020 12-1

Last Friday, our group began winding down our study of Barry Holtz’s Rabbi Akiva by discussing the latter half of Chapter 7 and Holtz’s “Epilogue.”  Among the issues covered were:

  • The circumstances surrounding Akiva’s torture and death.  In the absence of any corroborating historical or material verification, can we be certain that it occurred as depicted in the Talmud? Whether it happened or not, Akiva’s alleged execution reflects a rejection of the legitimacy of the Roman kingdom in favor of the Kingdom of God.  The fable of the fox (the Romans), the fish (the Jews), and the fishermen (the Christians) represents a resistance to assimilation into another belief system (leaving the environment that has sustained you–water/Jewish values and tradition).  The message is that without Torah Jews cannot survive.

  • The significance of Akiva’s reciting the Sh’ma at his death.  Was this the fulfillment of a commandment? A mocking of the Roman governor who tortured Akiva? A lesson to his students that we must “love God even if he takes away your life”?  We discussed the concept of martyrdom (of dying in the name of a cause) in various faith communities and martyrology, how martyrs are venerated in art, religious literature, and liturgy such as the Yom Kippur Eleh Ezkerah prayers.

  • Akiva’s Talmudic legacy:  While he is cited over 1000 times in the Babylonian Talmud, can we take such descriptions of his behavior and attributions of his teachings at face value?  What is to be gained by discussion of the differences between Akiva, who argued that “Love thy neighbor as thyself” is the “great principle” of Torah, and Ben Azzai who argued that the “great principle” was that all human beings are created in the image of God?

When we meet via Zoom on Friday, August 7, we’ll conclude our discussion of Rabbi Akiva, beginning with discussions of what takes priority: Torah study or practice/performance of mitzvot (what is commanded of us)?  We’ll also consider Akiva’s role in textual interpretation and  Talmudic parable that brings God, Moses, and Akiva together.

Our informal discussion group will be conducted online every Friday from 12-1.   All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. If you have questions, or would like the Zoom link, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

Please note the following:

The Noon Study Group will NOT meet on Friday, August 14.

We will meet on Friday, August 21, for a preview of our next unit of study:

Archaeology and the Bible

Our next unit of study will officially start on Friday, September 4 when we begin discussing

The Bible Unearthed: Archaeology’s New Vision of Ancient Israel and the Origin of Its Sacred Texts by Neil Asher Silberman and Israel Finklestein

Stay tuned to this web site for further details in the coming weeks.

 

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Oct
27
Sun
Healing from the Tree of Life Shooting & Confronting Antisemitism: A Memorial Service & Workshop
Oct 27 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Yahrzeit for Tree of Life

Sunday, October 27th at Congregation Beth HaTephila, 43 North Liberty Street

Healing from the Tree of Life Shooting & Confronting Antisemitism:

A Memorial Service & Workshop

 

Tree of Life Yahrzeit Memorial Service – 2 pm in Sanctuary

Join your Jewish community for a pluralistic memorial service honoring the victims of the Tree of Life shooting. Kosher oneg to immediately follow.

Confronting Antisemitism Workshop – 3:30 pm in Unger Hall

Join us for a free workshop exploring the relationship between antisemitism, white supremacy, and white nationalism. Learn more about the antisemitism that fueled the shooting and how we can transform our grief into action.

Geared towards a mature Jewish audience. Workshop registration requested for planning purposes, but not required. Register here or via email to Maia Ross Trupin at mrosstru@gmail.com

Sponsored by Carolina Jews for Justice – West

Organized by the Asheville Southern Jewish Collective:

Ben Kohan, Deanna Goldner, Hannah Limov, Lavender Ross, Maia Ross Trupin, Marika Straw, Nechoma Morgan, & Sarah Julia Seldin

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Online Torah on Tap
Oct 27 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
With so much of CBI’s programming unavoidably cancelled, we’re working hard to find ways we can support each other as a community when we can’t be together in person.

Please join me this Sunday, April 26, at 4:00pm, when we will be holding Torah on Tap via Zoom.

A link to the online discussion group is below.  Zoom is easy to use and will let us see and hear each other as we speak.  If you haven’t already downloaded Zoom to your computer or phone, you must do so before joining the meeting on Sunday at 4:00pm.  You only need to download Zoom once, after that you simply log in, always using the same Meeting ID: 819 7668 2790.  Easy instructions are below this message.

This is a temporary measure to keep us all connected while we can’t be together physically.

Alan Silverman

Torah on Tap Host

Instructions for Downloading Zoom

The first time you ever use Zoom on a computer, do the following:

Go to https://zoom.us
Hover over (don’t click) “RESOURCES” on the top right and then click “Download Zoom Client” from the drop-down menu that appears
Click “Download” under “Zoom Client for Meetings”
If it asks you to allow it to download “zoom.us”, click “Allow” or “Yes”
Open the downloaded file and follow the instructions to install Zoom on your computer

The first time you ever use Zoom on a smart phone, do the following:
Go to the App Store and find “Zoom Cloud Meetings” and download it (it is free)

Instructions for attending Torah on Tap on CBI’s Zoom Account:

Right before the start of services, either go to https://zoom.us on your computer or open your Zoom app on your smartphone
Click “Join a Meeting”
Type in this Meeting ID: 819 7668 2790 and click “Join”
If you’re using the computer and Zoom asks you to allow it to open “zoom.us”, click “Allow” or “Yes” or “Open” and then click “Join With Computer Audio”
If you’re using a smart phone and Zoom asks you to allow using the microphone/camera, allow it
If it says “Waiting for the host to start this meeting”, just wait a few minutes for Alan to start the meeting

Unless you’ve been out of the country for the last several weeks, you probably know that there’s some pretty important proceedings taking place in our nation’s capitol. In the 230-year history of the American presidency, only two sitting presidents have been impeached. President Trump may well be the third. The historicity of the proceedings, however, pale in comparison to real underlying battle. This is not just an investigation to determine whether impeachable offenses occurred; it is a tug war between strength and morality, and it’s as old as humanity itself.

Join us this Sunday as we look at the dynamics of accountability from a Jewish perspective. More specifically, we will consider one very particular confrontation involving Rabbi Shimon ben Shetach and King Yannai.

“Why is a king of Israel “not judged” [Mishnah Sanhedrin 2:1]? Because of what once happened.” 

Intrigued? Wait until you see how many parallels there are between this 2,100-year-old Talmudic tale and what is happening now in our country. To see how the story unfolds and to unlock the universal lessons it holds, join us this Sunday at Archetype Brewing (the former Habitat Tavern, 174 Broadway St., Asheville). Rabbi Justin will help us understand this epic power struggle between the executive and legislative branches of ancient Israel.

This program is free and open to all. Differing opinions are not only welcomed but encouraged. Non-alcoholic beverages are available, there is ample parking in the Moog Music parking lot off Bordeau Pl.

Looking forward to seeing you there!!

 

Unless you’ve been out of the country for the last several weeks, you probably know that there’s some pretty important proceedings taking place in our nation’s capitol. In the 230-year history of the American presidency, only two sitting presidents have been impeached. President Trump may well be the third. The historicity of the proceedings, however, pale in comparison to real underlying battle. This is not just an investigation to determine whether impeachable offenses occurred; it is a tug war between strength and morality, and it’s as old as humanity itself.

Join us this Sunday as we look at the dynamics of accountability from a Jewish perspective. More specifically, we will consider one very particular confrontation involving Rabbi Shimon ben Shetach and King Yannai.

“Why is a king of Israel “not judged” [Mishnah Sanhedrin 2:1]? Because of what once happened.” 

Intrigued? Wait until you see how many parallels there are between this 2,100-year-old Talmudic tale and what is happening now in our country. To see how the story unfolds and to unlock the universal lessons it holds, join us this Sunday at Archetype Brewing (the former Habitat Tavern, 174 Broadway St., Asheville). Rabbi Justin will help us understand this epic power struggle between the executive and legislative branches of ancient Israel.

This program is free and open to all. Differing opinions are not only welcomed but encouraged. Non-alcoholic beverages are available, there is ample parking in the Moog Music parking lot off Bordeau Pl.

Looking forward to seeing you there!!

Join us on the last Sunday of the month online for a refreshing and often provocative discussion. Each month, we take on a new topic – often ripped from the headlines of today’s news. We spend the first 45 minutes wrapping our arms around it, defining it, dissecting and analyzing it from various viewpoints. Then we spend the rest of the time discussing it from Judaism’s point of view.

  • What’s Judaism’s take on universal healthcare?
  • Would Moses walk the streets of Chicago today packing heat?
  • Is it okay to punch a white supremacist?

Torah on Tap gives us a chance to learn, vent, share and, most of all, understand what 4,000 years of cultural development, debate and dialogue has to say about some of the issues that confront us today. Torah on Tap is free and open to all. Varying viewpoints are not only welcome, but encouraged.

See you there!

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Dismantling the Sukkah
Oct 27 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
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Bonfire, Veggie Potluck & Torah on Tap
Oct 27 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
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Learn to Chant Torah Class
Oct 27 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

LEARN TO CHANT TORAH

You, too, can learn to chant Torah portions on Shabbat! Beth Israel Synagogue
will offer a series of classes this fall on learning the ta’amei ha-mikra (Torah
cantillation marks, or trope). No previous Torah chanting experience is
presumed, but you will need to know how to read Hebrew at least basically (i.e.,
how to pronounce words written in Hebrew, even if you don’t understand them).
It is not necessary to be able to read musical notation. All of the trope used in
regular Shabbat Torah chanting will be covered (we will not cover haftarah
trope or the special tropes used for holidays). The course will also cover the
function of cantillation marks as an aid to understanding the Biblical text and as
a guide for stressing the correct syllable, as well as some of the common
problem areas of proper Hebrew pronunciation. Frank Goldsmith will teach the
classes and will provide written and recorded materials.
The classes will be taught on five consecutive Sunday evenings beginning on
October 27 and concluding on November 24, from 6:00 to 7:30 pm in the social
hall at CBI. Each student will also be offered an aliyah to chant after
completion of the course. Thus you will have plenty of time to practice before
stepping up to the bima.
To register for the classes, please contact the CBI office, 828-252-8660, or
admin@bethisraelnc.org, by no later than Friday, October 4, so that we will
have time to prepare a sufficient number of materials for the students. Pursuant
to CBI’s policy for adult education events, there is a charge of $18 for CBI
members and $36 for non-members. Checks should be made payable to
Congregation Beth Israel and given to Lee when you register.

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Nov
1
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Nov 1 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

August 7, 2020 12-1

Last Friday, our group began winding down our study of Barry Holtz’s Rabbi Akiva by discussing the latter half of Chapter 7 and Holtz’s “Epilogue.”  Among the issues covered were:

  • The circumstances surrounding Akiva’s torture and death.  In the absence of any corroborating historical or material verification, can we be certain that it occurred as depicted in the Talmud? Whether it happened or not, Akiva’s alleged execution reflects a rejection of the legitimacy of the Roman kingdom in favor of the Kingdom of God.  The fable of the fox (the Romans), the fish (the Jews), and the fishermen (the Christians) represents a resistance to assimilation into another belief system (leaving the environment that has sustained you–water/Jewish values and tradition).  The message is that without Torah Jews cannot survive.

  • The significance of Akiva’s reciting the Sh’ma at his death.  Was this the fulfillment of a commandment? A mocking of the Roman governor who tortured Akiva? A lesson to his students that we must “love God even if he takes away your life”?  We discussed the concept of martyrdom (of dying in the name of a cause) in various faith communities and martyrology, how martyrs are venerated in art, religious literature, and liturgy such as the Yom Kippur Eleh Ezkerah prayers.

  • Akiva’s Talmudic legacy:  While he is cited over 1000 times in the Babylonian Talmud, can we take such descriptions of his behavior and attributions of his teachings at face value?  What is to be gained by discussion of the differences between Akiva, who argued that “Love thy neighbor as thyself” is the “great principle” of Torah, and Ben Azzai who argued that the “great principle” was that all human beings are created in the image of God?

When we meet via Zoom on Friday, August 7, we’ll conclude our discussion of Rabbi Akiva, beginning with discussions of what takes priority: Torah study or practice/performance of mitzvot (what is commanded of us)?  We’ll also consider Akiva’s role in textual interpretation and  Talmudic parable that brings God, Moses, and Akiva together.

Our informal discussion group will be conducted online every Friday from 12-1.   All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. If you have questions, or would like the Zoom link, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

Please note the following:

The Noon Study Group will NOT meet on Friday, August 14.

We will meet on Friday, August 21, for a preview of our next unit of study:

Archaeology and the Bible

Our next unit of study will officially start on Friday, September 4 when we begin discussing

The Bible Unearthed: Archaeology’s New Vision of Ancient Israel and the Origin of Its Sacred Texts by Neil Asher Silberman and Israel Finklestein

Stay tuned to this web site for further details in the coming weeks.

 

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