CBI Events Calendar

Apr
18
Sun
Security Training Event: Countering Active Threat
Apr 18 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Security Training Event Online

Announcing an Upcoming Online Training Event

for our Western North Carolina Jewish Community

2) Countering Active Threat Training (CATT): From the targeting of Jewish institutions by white
supremacists and followers of the so-called Islamic State to workplace violence issues,
institutions – to include workplaces, schools, hospitals and other places of public gathering –
face a heightened risk from active threats, whether firearms, knives, or emergent threats such
as vehicle attacks. Designed and built on the DHS “Run, Hide, Fight” strategy, this SCN course
provides strategies, guidance, and a proven plan for surviving an active threat event. Topics
include the history and prevalence of active shooter events, strategies for response and medical
issues. (See attached flyer)
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REGISTRATION

Register link for Situational Awareness training: Sunday, April 11, 2:00-4:00pm
Register here.
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZ0tf-GrqjsvGdY0ypGVQp-GMBrlv7LqkOaE

Register link for Countering Active Training (CATT): Sunday, April 18, 2:00-4:00pm
Register here.
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYucuCqrDMpGdR1Q-A0oJiFVDl01w49Whsp

*The Secure Community Network (SCN), a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization, is the official homeland security and safety initiative of the organized Jewish community in North America. It was founded in 2004 under the auspices of The Jewish Federations of North America. SCN provides timely, credible threat and incident information to both law enforcement and community partners, serves as the community’s formal liaison with federal law enforcement, and coordinates closely with state and local law enforcement partners. SCN works with communities and partners across North America to develop and implement strategic frameworks that enhance safety and security of the Jewish people, developing best practice policies and procedures, undertaking threat and vulnerability assessments, coordinating training and education, offering consultation on safety and security matters and providing crisis management support during critical incidents.

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Online Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle
Apr 18 @ 2:30 pm

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infusing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us via Zoom (every Sunday from 2:30pm – 4pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. Please contact Linda Wolf at linda@networktype.com for the online meeting information.

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Apr
23
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Apr 23 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Friday, April 9, 12-1

We began last week’s discussion by tying up some loose ends from Chapter 4 of Waskow’s Dancing in God’s Earthquake.  That chapter asserted that idolatry ”poisons the bloodstream of Torah.”  Those who make entities such as Israel and its government into idols become dead like idols.  Waskow suggests that we think of Israel not as an unchallengeable idol, but as a sculpture that must be repaired, or melted down and reshaped.
We then turned our attention from the second commandment, which cautions against idolatry, to the third, which deals with taking God’s name in vain, or as Waskow translates it, speaking of God in ways that are ”empty-headed” or ”empty-hearted.”  For Waskow, violating the third commandment means ”breathing without awareness that each breath we take connects us with all life.” Chapter 5 speaks of the many names that have been given to God.  He would like to see us replace many references to God that imply hierarchy/ God’s lordship and domination with ”ruach ha’olam” or Breath of Life. 
We spent a good deal of time discussing a blessing Waskow introduces on page 85 of his text and how our congregations would react to such a blessing.  This segued into the next chapter of Dancing in God’s Earthquake in which Waskow addresses the importance of prayer and possibilities for changing our liturgy so that it is infused with more bodily awareness and more consciousness of ecological crises on our planet.  Needless to say, any discussion of changes to our rituals of worship always generates a lot of discussion.  We barely began exploring some of Waskow’s recommendations in Chapter 6 for more ”embodied prayer”–a subject we will resume discussing when we next meet.   
For this coming Friday’s session, we will continue our discussion of Chapter 6 and Waskow’s suggestions for reshaping liturgy,  and then move on to chapters 7 and 8 ”God’s Image in the Human Jigsaw Puzzle” and ”Toward Justice: Brothers’ War and Reconciliation” (pp. 97-140; it’s not likely that we will get far into chapter 8).  
Our informal discussion group is held online every Friday from 12-1.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions.  Dancing in God’s Earthquake can be ordered through a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, or would like the Zoom link, please contact Jay Jacoby at  jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Online Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI
Apr 23 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Online Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

With services unavoidably cancelled, the Ritual Committee is working hard to find ways we can support each other as a community when we can’t be together in person. It’s very distressing to be unable to say Kaddish for a loved one, or to contemplate not sharing a Seder meal with friends and family. We’d like to share with you some plans we have for filling these gaps in our lives.

Please join us for Kabbalat Shabbat services via Zoom.  As long as at least 10 adults log in, we’ll be able to say Kaddish, so please consider attending, even if you’re not a Friday night regular.

You can join the service by going to Our Virtual Community here, then scroll down and click on the blue Kabbalat Shabbat Service button.

If you’d like to borrow a siddur for use at home while services are cancelled, we’ll be happy to lend you one!  Please contact the office for details.

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Apr
24
Sat
Torah Study with Justin Goldstein
Apr 24 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Join Justin Goldstein for an hour of Torah study and discussion of the week’s Torah portion.

All are welcome, link to join the Zoom meeting here.

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Apr
25
Sun
Online Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle
Apr 25 @ 2:30 pm

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infusing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us via Zoom (every Sunday from 2:30pm – 4pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. Please contact Linda Wolf at linda@networktype.com for the online meeting information.

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Online Torah on Tap
Apr 25 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
With so much of CBI’s programming unavoidably cancelled, we’re working hard to find ways we can support each other as a community when we can’t be together in person.

Please join me this Sunday, April 26, at 4:00pm, when we will be holding Torah on Tap via Zoom.

A link to the online discussion group is below.  Zoom is easy to use and will let us see and hear each other as we speak.  If you haven’t already downloaded Zoom to your computer or phone, you must do so before joining the meeting on Sunday at 4:00pm.  You only need to download Zoom once, after that you simply log in, always using the same Meeting ID: 819 7668 2790.  Easy instructions are below this message.

This is a temporary measure to keep us all connected while we can’t be together physically.

Alan Silverman

Torah on Tap Host

Instructions for Downloading Zoom

The first time you ever use Zoom on a computer, do the following:

Go to https://zoom.us
Hover over (don’t click) “RESOURCES” on the top right and then click “Download Zoom Client” from the drop-down menu that appears
Click “Download” under “Zoom Client for Meetings”
If it asks you to allow it to download “zoom.us”, click “Allow” or “Yes”
Open the downloaded file and follow the instructions to install Zoom on your computer

The first time you ever use Zoom on a smart phone, do the following:
Go to the App Store and find “Zoom Cloud Meetings” and download it (it is free)

Instructions for attending Torah on Tap on CBI’s Zoom Account:

Right before the start of services, either go to https://zoom.us on your computer or open your Zoom app on your smartphone
Click “Join a Meeting”
Type in this Meeting ID: 819 7668 2790 and click “Join”
If you’re using the computer and Zoom asks you to allow it to open “zoom.us”, click “Allow” or “Yes” or “Open” and then click “Join With Computer Audio”
If you’re using a smart phone and Zoom asks you to allow using the microphone/camera, allow it
If it says “Waiting for the host to start this meeting”, just wait a few minutes for Alan to start the meeting

Join us on the last Sunday of the month online for a refreshing and often provocative discussion. Each month, we take on a new topic – often ripped from the headlines of today’s news. We spend the first 45 minutes wrapping our arms around it, defining it, dissecting and analyzing it from various viewpoints. Then we spend the rest of the time discussing it from Judaism’s point of view.

  • What’s Judaism’s take on universal healthcare?
  • Would Moses walk the streets of Chicago today packing heat?
  • Is it okay to punch a white supremacist?

Torah on Tap gives us a chance to learn, vent, share and, most of all, understand what 4,000 years of cultural development, debate and dialogue has to say about some of the issues that confront us today. Torah on Tap is free and open to all. Varying viewpoints are not only welcome, but encouraged.

See you there!

 

 

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