CBI Events Calendar

May
5
Sun
CBI Beit Midrash
May 5 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

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Jewish Jazz Concert with AmiciMusic @ Congregation Beth Israel
May 5 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Jewish Jazz Concert
Sunday, May 5, 2019
2:00-4:00pm
at Congregation Beth Israel
229 Murdock Ave.  Asheville, NC 28804
AmiciMusic, Asheville’s own award-winning chamber music ensemble, returns to Congregation Beth Israel for another exciting “JEWISH JAZZ” concert with all new music.  Steve Loew, clarinet, and Daniel Weiser, piano will perform this incredible program of clarinet and piano music that highlight some important Klezmer influences on the jazz instrumentalists and composers of this period, many of whom were Jewish.  Dr. Weiser will tell the fascinating story of the great fusion of musical styles from ragtime to blues to Klezmer that helped produce the new Jazz style in New York City in the first decades of the 20th century as the wave of Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe met up with the Great Migration of African-Americans from the South. This program features some more wonderful Klezmer-inspired pieces by Lev Kogan and Michele Magnani, as well as works by Benny GoodmanGeorge GershwinLeonard Bernstein, and more. Loew and Weiser have performed in over 20 countries around the world and put on a show that is second to none.
You will not want to miss this!
Tickets $25 per person. Refreshments served. Call Congregation Beth Israel 828-252-8660 for reservations.
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May
8
Wed
Meet the Midrash
May 8 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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May
9
Thu
CBI Board meeting
May 9 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
CBI Board meeting
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May
10
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
May 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI
May 10 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Join us in welcoming Shabbat with prayer and song.

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May
11
Sat
Shabbat Morning Services @ CBI
May 11 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for a participatory, high-energy Shabbat service, sure to inspire, uplift, educate and engage. Be sure to hang around for food and schmoozing at our Kiddish lunch.

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May
12
Sun
CBI Beit Midrash
May 12 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

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May
15
Wed
Meet the Midrash
May 15 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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May
17
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
May 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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May
18
Sat
Shabbat Morning Services @ CBI
May 18 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for a participatory, high-energy Shabbat service, sure to inspire, uplift, educate and engage. Be sure to hang around for food and schmoozing at our Kiddish lunch.

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Milk & Honey Hour @ CBI
May 18 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am
Milk & Honey Hour @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

CBI’s Milk & Honey Hour brings together young Jewish families to schmooze and acclimate their little ones (newborn to 4 yrs) to their spiritual home away from home. Once a month on the third Saturday of the month, we meet at CBI for an hour-long Jewish experience designed to expose children to the sights, sounds and smells of Judaism.

The first 30 minutes is for socializing and playing, enjoying read-to-me time and allowing the little ones to explore the synagogue. Feel free to wander where your child leads, in and out of the sanctuary, on to the bima, nothing is off limits.

The second half features singing with Penny White, Jewish Asheville’s pied piper. She’ll teach Shabbat songs, nigguns (wordless melodies), Hebrew  lullabies and Jewish holiday tunes you can continue singing to your kids at home. While the youngest absorb the rhythms and melodies, the older toddlers are encouraged to play along on drums and tambourines.

All the while, the kids are exposed to the in the background sounds and melodies of the Shabbat service coming from the sanctuary. The entire hour-long experience is designed to imprint positive Jewish memories that will last a lifetime. This program is designed for any Jewish family with kids under the age of four. You need not be a member of CBI to participate.

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Youth Shabbat @ CBI
May 18 @ 10:45 am – 12:30 pm
Youth Shabbat @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

The third Saturday of each month, children, parents and youths of all ages are invited to join Josefa Briant in the small sanctuary for a kid-friendly, family-friendly introduction to the joy of Shabbat. Make sure to stick around for Shabbat kiddush for shmoozing and lunch!  

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May
19
Sun
Cafe Israel @ Congregation Beth Israel
May 19 @ 11:00 am – 2:00 pm

Cafe Israel

Sunday, May 19, 2019

at Congregation Beth Israel, 229 Murdock Ave.  Asheville 28804

Join us in celebrating Israel’s birthday with great Israeli food, drink, music and dance.  Visit our Bedouin tent, enjoy kids’ activities.  Finish the Falafel 5K with free falafel sandwich!

All are welcome!

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Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle @ Congregation Beth HaTephila
May 19 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle @ Congregation Beth HaTephila | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infuing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us (usually) on the first and third Sunday of each month from 1pm – 3pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. While CBI’s building is undergoing renovations, we will be meeting downstairs at Congregation Beth Ha Tephila, 43 North Libery Street in North Asheville.

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May
22
Wed
Meet the Midrash
May 22 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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May
24
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
May 24 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI
May 24 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Join CBI families and kids, members and visitors of all ages as we come together to welcome Shabbat with prayer, song and inspiration.

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May
25
Sat
Shabbat Morning Services @ CBI
May 25 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for a participatory, high-energy Shabbat service, sure to inspire, uplift, educate and engage. Be sure to hang around for food and schmoozing at our Kiddish lunch.

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Hasidishe Kiddush
May 25 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Hasidishe Kiddush

Warm your heart and soul with Torah (and schnapps…) and join together to learn Hasidic thought and wisdom on parashat ha’shavu’a, the weekly Torah portion. We’ll meet on the last Shabbat of each month, at 12:30 pm in the small sanctuary.  All are welcome.

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May
26
Sun
CBI Beit Midrash
May 26 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

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Torah on Tap
May 26 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Torah on Tap

Join us on the last Sunday of the month at Habitat Tavern and Commons for a refreshing and often provocative discussion over a pint (or two) of great brew. Each month, we take on a new topic – often ripped from the headlines of today’s news. We spend the first 45 minutes wrapping our arms around it, defining it, dissecting and analyzing it from various viewpoints. Then we spend the rest of the time discussing it from Judaism’s point of view.

  • What’s Judaism’s take on universal healthcare?
  • Would Moses walk the streets of Chicago today packing heat?
  • Is it okay to punch a white supremacist?
  • Developing a practice of gratitude
  • Gender identity and Juadaism

Torah on Tap gives us a chance to learn, vent, share and, most of all, understand what 4,000 years of cultural development, debate and dialogue has to say about some of the issues that confront us today. Torah on Tap is free and open to all. Varying viewpoints are not only welcome, but encouraged.

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May
29
Wed
Meet the Midrash
May 29 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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May
31
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
May 31 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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Jun
1
Sat
Shabbat Morning Services @ CBI
Jun 1 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for a participatory, high-energy Shabbat service, sure to inspire, uplift, educate and engage. Be sure to hang around for food and schmoozing at our Kiddish lunch.

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Jun
2
Sun
CBI Beit Midrash
Jun 2 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

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Jun
4
Tue
Exec Committee Meeting
Jun 4 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
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Jun
5
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Jun 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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Jun
7
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Jun 7 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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Jun
8
Sat
Shabbat Morning Services @ CBI
Jun 8 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for a participatory, high-energy Shabbat service, sure to inspire, uplift, educate and engage. Be sure to hang around for food and schmoozing at our Kiddish lunch.

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Tikkun Leil Shavuot 5779
Jun 8 @ 9:30 pm – Jun 9 @ 6:00 am
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Jun
9
Sun
Shavuot Morning Services
Jun 9 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm
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Jun
10
Mon
Shavuot Morning Services
Jun 10 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm
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Jun
12
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Jun 12 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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Jun
13
Thu
CBI Board meeting
Jun 13 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
CBI Board meeting
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Jun
14
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Jun 14 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI
Jun 14 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Join us in welcoming Shabbat with prayer and song.

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Jun
15
Sat
Shabbat Morning Services @ CBI
Jun 15 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for a participatory, high-energy Shabbat service, sure to inspire, uplift, educate and engage. Be sure to hang around for food and schmoozing at our Kiddish lunch.

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Jun
16
Sun
Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle @ Congregation Beth HaTephila
Jun 16 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle @ Congregation Beth HaTephila | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infuing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us (usually) on the first and third Sunday of each month from 1pm – 3pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. While CBI’s building is undergoing renovations, we will be meeting downstairs at Congregation Beth Ha Tephila, 43 North Libery Street in North Asheville.

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Jun
19
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Jun 19 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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