CBI Events Calendar

Mar
27
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Mar 27 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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Mar
29
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Mar 29 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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Mar
31
Sun
CBI Beit Midrash
Mar 31 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

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Torah on Tap
Mar 31 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Torah on Tap

Join us on the last Sunday of the month at Habitat Tavern and Commons for a refreshing and often provocative discussion over a pint (or two) of great brew. Each month, we take on a new topic – often ripped from the headlines of today’s news. We spend the first 45 minutes wrapping our arms around it, defining it, dissecting and analyzing it from various viewpoints. Then we spend the rest of the time discussing it from Judaism’s point of view.

  • What’s Judaism’s take on universal healthcare?
  • Would Moses walk the streets of Chicago today packing heat?
  • Is it okay to punch a white supremacist?
  • Developing a practice of gratitude
  • Gender identity and Juadaism

Torah on Tap gives us a chance to learn, vent, share and, most of all, understand what 4,000 years of cultural development, debate and dialogue has to say about some of the issues that confront us today. Torah on Tap is free and open to all. Varying viewpoints are not only welcome, but encouraged.

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Apr
3
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Apr 3 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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Apr
5
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Apr 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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Apr
7
Sun
CBI Beit Midrash
Apr 7 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

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Apr
10
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Apr 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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Apr
12
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Apr 12 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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Apr
17
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Apr 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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Apr
19
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Apr 19 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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Apr
24
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Apr 24 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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Apr
26
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Apr 26 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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Apr
28
Sun
CBI Beit Midrash
Apr 28 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

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Torah on Tap
Apr 28 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Torah on Tap

Join us on the last Sunday of the month at Habitat Tavern and Commons for a refreshing and often provocative discussion over a pint (or two) of great brew. Each month, we take on a new topic – often ripped from the headlines of today’s news. We spend the first 45 minutes wrapping our arms around it, defining it, dissecting and analyzing it from various viewpoints. Then we spend the rest of the time discussing it from Judaism’s point of view.

  • What’s Judaism’s take on universal healthcare?
  • Would Moses walk the streets of Chicago today packing heat?
  • Is it okay to punch a white supremacist?
  • Developing a practice of gratitude
  • Gender identity and Juadaism

Torah on Tap gives us a chance to learn, vent, share and, most of all, understand what 4,000 years of cultural development, debate and dialogue has to say about some of the issues that confront us today. Torah on Tap is free and open to all. Varying viewpoints are not only welcome, but encouraged.

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May
1
Wed
Meet the Midrash
May 1 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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May
3
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
May 3 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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May
5
Sun
CBI Beit Midrash
May 5 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

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May
8
Wed
Meet the Midrash
May 8 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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May
10
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
May 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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May
12
Sun
CBI Beit Midrash
May 12 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

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May
15
Wed
Meet the Midrash
May 15 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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May
17
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
May 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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May
22
Wed
Meet the Midrash
May 22 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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May
24
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
May 24 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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May
26
Sun
CBI Beit Midrash
May 26 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

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Torah on Tap
May 26 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Torah on Tap

Join us on the last Sunday of the month at Habitat Tavern and Commons for a refreshing and often provocative discussion over a pint (or two) of great brew. Each month, we take on a new topic – often ripped from the headlines of today’s news. We spend the first 45 minutes wrapping our arms around it, defining it, dissecting and analyzing it from various viewpoints. Then we spend the rest of the time discussing it from Judaism’s point of view.

  • What’s Judaism’s take on universal healthcare?
  • Would Moses walk the streets of Chicago today packing heat?
  • Is it okay to punch a white supremacist?
  • Developing a practice of gratitude
  • Gender identity and Juadaism

Torah on Tap gives us a chance to learn, vent, share and, most of all, understand what 4,000 years of cultural development, debate and dialogue has to say about some of the issues that confront us today. Torah on Tap is free and open to all. Varying viewpoints are not only welcome, but encouraged.

Sharing is caring
May
29
Wed
Meet the Midrash
May 29 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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May
31
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
May 31 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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Jun
2
Sun
CBI Beit Midrash
Jun 2 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

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Jun
5
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Jun 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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Jun
7
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Jun 7 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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Jun
12
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Jun 12 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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Jun
14
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Jun 14 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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Jun
19
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Jun 19 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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Jun
21
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Jun 21 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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  • 1
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Jun
26
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Jun 26 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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Jun
28
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Jun 28 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, March 29, 12-1

This week, we continued our discussion of “Dear Zealots,” the first of the essays in Amos Oz’s collection, Dear Zealots:  Letters from a Divided Land. We focused on Oz’s contention that the essence 0f Jewish culture emerges from two basic tendencies, one moral and one intellectual.  The moral tendency rests on the principle of “cause no pain,” our reverence for the sanctity of human life and a belief in the equality of human worth (we cannot determine “whose blood is redder”).  Oz is concerned that this principle is diminishing in Israel.  The intellectual tendency that Oz emphasizes is the Jewish reverence for books, which he contends passes down the lifeblood of Jewish culture.  By books, Oz does not mean a particular text (e.g. Torah, Talmud, Shulchan Aruch) but rather the fact that our texts are always reinterpreting one another, exploring and sometimes undermining their predecessors to show their ideas in a different light.  Here Oz makes the point that Jews thrive on disagreement, that it is “a vital climate for the growth of a creative life.”

Next week we’ll address any loose ends from Chapter 2, and then move on to a consideration of the final essay in Oz’s collection, “Dreams Israel Should Let Go of Soon” (pp. 109-136).  Please come prepared to share whatever knots you encounter in the text and we’ll see what we can do to untangle them.

Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1 in the CBI Library.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. Oz’s book is available at a variety of internet outlets.

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Jun
30
Sun
Torah on Tap
Jun 30 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Torah on Tap

Join us on the last Sunday of the month at Habitat Tavern and Commons for a refreshing and often provocative discussion over a pint (or two) of great brew. Each month, we take on a new topic – often ripped from the headlines of today’s news. We spend the first 45 minutes wrapping our arms around it, defining it, dissecting and analyzing it from various viewpoints. Then we spend the rest of the time discussing it from Judaism’s point of view.

  • What’s Judaism’s take on universal healthcare?
  • Would Moses walk the streets of Chicago today packing heat?
  • Is it okay to punch a white supremacist?
  • Developing a practice of gratitude
  • Gender identity and Juadaism

Torah on Tap gives us a chance to learn, vent, share and, most of all, understand what 4,000 years of cultural development, debate and dialogue has to say about some of the issues that confront us today. Torah on Tap is free and open to all. Varying viewpoints are not only welcome, but encouraged.

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Jul
3
Wed
Meet the Midrash
Jul 3 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Meet the Midrash @ Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Meet the Midrash
Wednesdays, noon to 1:00 pm
Published Tuesday, March 18, 2014 8:00 am

Out of the texts of the Torah, the Rabbis created teachings bringing deeper meanings to the wisdom of the Jewish people known as Midrash. Each week we will explore some of these teachings based on the weekly Torah portion. We will gain not only an understanding of what the Rabbis were teaching, but how and why they were able to offer these teachings. While there are many compilations of Midrash from different periods in Jewish history, we will focus our studies on Midrash Rabbah.

Wednesdays 12 noon – 1pm

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