CBI Events Calendar

Mar
1
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Mar 1 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, October 11, 12:00-1:00

The Noon Study group will NOT meet on Friday, October 11. 

Last week we discussed Chapter’s 10 and 11 Rabbi Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World.   Several of us agreed that these were the most lucid chapters that we’ve read so far–provided that we accept that the Hebrew Bible is a foundational text for Western Civilization.  Sacks contends that the Hebrew Bible is an “extended essay on human responsibility.”  These chapters begin his chronological demonstration of how biblical stories direct human ethics starting with the Book of Genesis.  Adam and Eve denied personal responsibility, shifting blame to one another and God.  Cain denies that responsibility is an imperative, asking “Am I my Brother’s Keeper?” Noah acted as though he were responsible only to himself and his family, not others.  The builders of the Tower of Babel usurped the role of God, thinking they were answerable to no one but themselves. It is not until Abraham and his plea for the inhabitants of Sodom that we see moral responsibility exercised.  This continues with the generation of Moses and the Israelites’ acceptance of the covenant at Sinai:  “We will do everything that the Lord has said.”  With that pledge human initiative combines with divine initiative–God may have begun the work, but we are asked to complete it. 
When we resume on October 18, we’ll take up Chapters 12 and 13:  “The Holy and the Good” and “The Monotheistic Imagination.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library (or the Social Hall if our group is too large).  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Shabbatluck at Elie & Sara’s
Mar 1 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

CBI MARCH SHABBATLUCK

Friday, March 1st at 6:30pm

Elie’s and Sara’s home, near Kenilworth

This potluck is limited to 20 participants

This will be a vegetarian/dairy/fish  meal

*Elie’s and Sara’s home address will be sent sent out to registered attendees the week of the Shabbatluck.*

To RSVP click here.

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Mar
8
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Mar 8 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, October 11, 12:00-1:00

The Noon Study group will NOT meet on Friday, October 11. 

Last week we discussed Chapter’s 10 and 11 Rabbi Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World.   Several of us agreed that these were the most lucid chapters that we’ve read so far–provided that we accept that the Hebrew Bible is a foundational text for Western Civilization.  Sacks contends that the Hebrew Bible is an “extended essay on human responsibility.”  These chapters begin his chronological demonstration of how biblical stories direct human ethics starting with the Book of Genesis.  Adam and Eve denied personal responsibility, shifting blame to one another and God.  Cain denies that responsibility is an imperative, asking “Am I my Brother’s Keeper?” Noah acted as though he were responsible only to himself and his family, not others.  The builders of the Tower of Babel usurped the role of God, thinking they were answerable to no one but themselves. It is not until Abraham and his plea for the inhabitants of Sodom that we see moral responsibility exercised.  This continues with the generation of Moses and the Israelites’ acceptance of the covenant at Sinai:  “We will do everything that the Lord has said.”  With that pledge human initiative combines with divine initiative–God may have begun the work, but we are asked to complete it. 
When we resume on October 18, we’ll take up Chapters 12 and 13:  “The Holy and the Good” and “The Monotheistic Imagination.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library (or the Social Hall if our group is too large).  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Family Shabbat @ CBI
Mar 8 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Family Shabbat @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Families, kids, and different generations come together to welcome Shabbat with prayer and song and share in a potluck.

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Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI
Mar 8 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Join us in welcoming Shabbat with prayer and song.

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Mar
9
Sat
Shabbat Morning Services – Women of the Wall Shabbat @ CBI
Mar 9 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Inline image

Join us as we mark the 30th anniversary of the struggle of Women of the Wall (Nashot Hakotel) to pray out loud as women in the women’s section of the Western Wall in Jerusalem. Women of the Wall gather every Rosh Hodesh (New Moon) and their efforts to conduct joyful prayer continue to be thwarted, even though the Israeli courts have ruled in their favor for the right to do so. Their actions are part of the greater quest for religious pluralism and equality, and recognition of the non-Orthodox branches of Judaism in Israel.

Jewish communities throughout the world are joining in solidarity with Women of the Wall this Shabbat, which coincides with International Women’s Day. Here at CBI, our Shabbat morning service will be women-led, with a special D’var Torah by Julie Sherman.

For more information about Women of the Wall, go to https://www.womenofthewall.org.il/

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Mar
10
Sun
Dinner & a Movie: Russian Jews @ Congregation Beth Israel
Mar 10 @ 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Dinner and a Movie is back!!!

Sunday, March 10, 5:00 – 7:30 or 8:00 PM
CRITICALLY-ACCLAIMED DOCUMENTARY ON RUSSIAN JEWS

The critically acclaimed documentary trilogy “Russian Jews” intimately portrays the stories of
Russian Jewry throughout the 20th century. The first film of the trilogy will be screened at CBI
along with a dairy/parve potluck dinner, all on Sunday March 10th starting at 5:00 PM.
After a record-breaking theatrical release across Russia, the film has enjoyed a premiere at
Israel’s Knesset and sold-out screenings across the United States, Ukraine, the United Kingdom,
Latvia and Georgia. The trilogy has graced Jewish film festivals in Moscow, Manchester, Atlanta
and Australia. “Russian Jews” was created by famous Russian journalist/TV host Leonid
Parfenov, and provides much-needed context for our own Russian-Jewish heritage and history.

The first film of the trilogy, “Russian Jews. Film 1. Before the Revolution,” tells the story of the
Jewish people across the Russian Empire, their traditional way of life and their assimilation into
society at large, including famous bankers, scientists and artists who reshaped Russian Jews’
attitudes toward the rites of their ancestry. It is a story about the Beilis Affair, the pogroms and
about the first wave of Jewish emigration from Russia. The film also chronicles the
revolutionaries who shattered the Tsarist regime and changed the fate of the country in
October 1917. Hebrew and English subtitles are provided throughout.

Please join together to nosh, schmooze and enjoy the first of this amazing film trilogy in CBI’s
newly renovated social hall! Dairy/parve potluck (coffee/tea provided).

Congregation Beth Israel, 229 Murdock Ave., Asheville NC
This event sponsored by the Adult Education Committee of Congregation Beth Israel, Asheville NC

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Mar
15
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Mar 15 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, October 11, 12:00-1:00

The Noon Study group will NOT meet on Friday, October 11. 

Last week we discussed Chapter’s 10 and 11 Rabbi Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World.   Several of us agreed that these were the most lucid chapters that we’ve read so far–provided that we accept that the Hebrew Bible is a foundational text for Western Civilization.  Sacks contends that the Hebrew Bible is an “extended essay on human responsibility.”  These chapters begin his chronological demonstration of how biblical stories direct human ethics starting with the Book of Genesis.  Adam and Eve denied personal responsibility, shifting blame to one another and God.  Cain denies that responsibility is an imperative, asking “Am I my Brother’s Keeper?” Noah acted as though he were responsible only to himself and his family, not others.  The builders of the Tower of Babel usurped the role of God, thinking they were answerable to no one but themselves. It is not until Abraham and his plea for the inhabitants of Sodom that we see moral responsibility exercised.  This continues with the generation of Moses and the Israelites’ acceptance of the covenant at Sinai:  “We will do everything that the Lord has said.”  With that pledge human initiative combines with divine initiative–God may have begun the work, but we are asked to complete it. 
When we resume on October 18, we’ll take up Chapters 12 and 13:  “The Holy and the Good” and “The Monotheistic Imagination.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library (or the Social Hall if our group is too large).  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Mar
16
Sat
Talia Weizman Bat Mitzvah & Shabbat Morning Services @ Congregation Beth Israel
Mar 16 @ 9:30 am – 1:00 pm

Join the Weizman and Simon families in celebrating as Talia Weizman becomes Bat Mitzvah on Saturday, March 16 at Congregation Beth Israel.

Kiddush following the service will be hosted by Mike Weizman & Della Simon in honor of their daughter Talia.

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Youth Shabbat @ CBI
Mar 16 @ 10:45 am – 12:30 pm
Youth Shabbat @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

The third Saturday of each month, children, parents and youths of all ages are invited to join Josefa Briant in the small sanctuary for a kid-friendly, family-friendly introduction to the joy of Shabbat. Make sure to stick around for Shabbat kiddush for shmoozing and lunch!  

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Mar
17
Sun
Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle @ Congregation Beth HaTephila
Mar 17 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle @ Congregation Beth HaTephila | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infuing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us (usually) on the first and third Sunday of each month from 1pm – 3pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. Congregation Beth Ha Tephila, 43 North Libery Street in North Asheville.

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Mar
20
Wed
Megillah Reading and Purim Potluck
Mar 20 @ 7:15 pm
Join your CBI Family for a Megillah Reading & PURIM Potluck
Come in Costume, bring a Vegetarian dish to share, and be ready to BOO!
Wednesday, March 20
7:15 Vegetarian Potluck
8:00 Megillah Reading
BYOB!
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Mar
21
Thu
Shaharit and Megillah Reading
Mar 21 @ 9:30 am – 11:30 am
Mar
22
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Mar 22 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, October 11, 12:00-1:00

The Noon Study group will NOT meet on Friday, October 11. 

Last week we discussed Chapter’s 10 and 11 Rabbi Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World.   Several of us agreed that these were the most lucid chapters that we’ve read so far–provided that we accept that the Hebrew Bible is a foundational text for Western Civilization.  Sacks contends that the Hebrew Bible is an “extended essay on human responsibility.”  These chapters begin his chronological demonstration of how biblical stories direct human ethics starting with the Book of Genesis.  Adam and Eve denied personal responsibility, shifting blame to one another and God.  Cain denies that responsibility is an imperative, asking “Am I my Brother’s Keeper?” Noah acted as though he were responsible only to himself and his family, not others.  The builders of the Tower of Babel usurped the role of God, thinking they were answerable to no one but themselves. It is not until Abraham and his plea for the inhabitants of Sodom that we see moral responsibility exercised.  This continues with the generation of Moses and the Israelites’ acceptance of the covenant at Sinai:  “We will do everything that the Lord has said.”  With that pledge human initiative combines with divine initiative–God may have begun the work, but we are asked to complete it. 
When we resume on October 18, we’ll take up Chapters 12 and 13:  “The Holy and the Good” and “The Monotheistic Imagination.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library (or the Social Hall if our group is too large).  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI
Mar 22 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Join CBI families and kids, members and visitors of all ages as we come together to welcome Shabbat with prayer, song and inspiration.

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Mar
29
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Mar 29 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, October 11, 12:00-1:00

The Noon Study group will NOT meet on Friday, October 11. 

Last week we discussed Chapter’s 10 and 11 Rabbi Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World.   Several of us agreed that these were the most lucid chapters that we’ve read so far–provided that we accept that the Hebrew Bible is a foundational text for Western Civilization.  Sacks contends that the Hebrew Bible is an “extended essay on human responsibility.”  These chapters begin his chronological demonstration of how biblical stories direct human ethics starting with the Book of Genesis.  Adam and Eve denied personal responsibility, shifting blame to one another and God.  Cain denies that responsibility is an imperative, asking “Am I my Brother’s Keeper?” Noah acted as though he were responsible only to himself and his family, not others.  The builders of the Tower of Babel usurped the role of God, thinking they were answerable to no one but themselves. It is not until Abraham and his plea for the inhabitants of Sodom that we see moral responsibility exercised.  This continues with the generation of Moses and the Israelites’ acceptance of the covenant at Sinai:  “We will do everything that the Lord has said.”  With that pledge human initiative combines with divine initiative–God may have begun the work, but we are asked to complete it. 
When we resume on October 18, we’ll take up Chapters 12 and 13:  “The Holy and the Good” and “The Monotheistic Imagination.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library (or the Social Hall if our group is too large).  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Mar
30
Sat
Teen-Led Shabbat Services
Mar 30 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for the year’s first Teen-led Shabbat. Come celebrate with us and be sure to  stick around for Kiddush luncheon.

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Mar
31
Sun
Torah on Tap: Justice/Revenge @ Archetype Brewing
Mar 31 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Torah on Tap: Justice/Revenge @ Archetype Brewing  | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Torah on Tap returns, Sunday March 31.

Even as we prepare to celebrate the foundational holiday of Passover, which is grounded in the concepts of redemption, freedom and rebirth, the last of the ISIS fighters in Syria are being rounded up and taken prisoner. For the last several years, ISIS has been synonymous with terrorism and unspeakable brutality. Their hatred went viral as they live streamed public executions, human degradation and more.

Now that they are the prisoners at the mercy of their captors – we must confront an old question: What is justice and where is the line between Justice and Revenge?

Join us at the former Habitat Tavern and Commons  (now Archetype Brewing) for a sobering discussion of where and how we draw the line between justice and revenge.

  • What can we learn from the Nuremburg Trials following the Holocaust?
  • What does true justice as defined by our sages look like?
  • Or is justice the balance between revenge and mercy?

As always, Torah on Tap is free and open to all. Varying viewpoints are not only welcome, but encouraged. Archetype is located in downtown Asheville, next door to Moog Music. There’s plenty of parking in the rear. And good news if you’re hungry, they’ll have small, locally-made bites available for purchase, including Poppy Popcorn, Asheville Pretzel Company pretzels, and Hickory Nut Gap Farm meat sticks. Roots hummus coming soon!

See you there!

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Apr
5
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Apr 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, October 11, 12:00-1:00

The Noon Study group will NOT meet on Friday, October 11. 

Last week we discussed Chapter’s 10 and 11 Rabbi Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World.   Several of us agreed that these were the most lucid chapters that we’ve read so far–provided that we accept that the Hebrew Bible is a foundational text for Western Civilization.  Sacks contends that the Hebrew Bible is an “extended essay on human responsibility.”  These chapters begin his chronological demonstration of how biblical stories direct human ethics starting with the Book of Genesis.  Adam and Eve denied personal responsibility, shifting blame to one another and God.  Cain denies that responsibility is an imperative, asking “Am I my Brother’s Keeper?” Noah acted as though he were responsible only to himself and his family, not others.  The builders of the Tower of Babel usurped the role of God, thinking they were answerable to no one but themselves. It is not until Abraham and his plea for the inhabitants of Sodom that we see moral responsibility exercised.  This continues with the generation of Moses and the Israelites’ acceptance of the covenant at Sinai:  “We will do everything that the Lord has said.”  With that pledge human initiative combines with divine initiative–God may have begun the work, but we are asked to complete it. 
When we resume on October 18, we’ll take up Chapters 12 and 13:  “The Holy and the Good” and “The Monotheistic Imagination.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library (or the Social Hall if our group is too large).  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Apr
6
Sat
Shabbat Morning Services and New Member Welcome @ CBI
Apr 6 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for a participatory, high-energy Shabbat service, sure to inspire, uplift, educate and engage. Be sure to hang around for food and schmoozing at our Kiddish lunch.

We’ll welcome our new members, sisters Patti and Judi Haskell.

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Apr
12
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Apr 12 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, October 11, 12:00-1:00

The Noon Study group will NOT meet on Friday, October 11. 

Last week we discussed Chapter’s 10 and 11 Rabbi Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World.   Several of us agreed that these were the most lucid chapters that we’ve read so far–provided that we accept that the Hebrew Bible is a foundational text for Western Civilization.  Sacks contends that the Hebrew Bible is an “extended essay on human responsibility.”  These chapters begin his chronological demonstration of how biblical stories direct human ethics starting with the Book of Genesis.  Adam and Eve denied personal responsibility, shifting blame to one another and God.  Cain denies that responsibility is an imperative, asking “Am I my Brother’s Keeper?” Noah acted as though he were responsible only to himself and his family, not others.  The builders of the Tower of Babel usurped the role of God, thinking they were answerable to no one but themselves. It is not until Abraham and his plea for the inhabitants of Sodom that we see moral responsibility exercised.  This continues with the generation of Moses and the Israelites’ acceptance of the covenant at Sinai:  “We will do everything that the Lord has said.”  With that pledge human initiative combines with divine initiative–God may have begun the work, but we are asked to complete it. 
When we resume on October 18, we’ll take up Chapters 12 and 13:  “The Holy and the Good” and “The Monotheistic Imagination.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library (or the Social Hall if our group is too large).  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI
Apr 12 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Join us in welcoming Shabbat with prayer and song.

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Apr
19
Fri
Siyyum Bekhorot Study & Burning Hametz
Apr 19 @ 9:00 am – 11:00 am

All are invited for a short pre-Pessah study session with Rabbi Goldstein beginning at 9:00am on Friday, April 19.

Fast of the Firstborn (Hebrew: תענית בכורות, Ta’anit B’khorot or תענית בכורים, Ta’anit B’khorim); is a unique fast day in Judaism which usually falls on the day before Passover. Usually, the fast is broken at a siyum celebration (typically made at the conclusion of the morning services), which, according to prevailing custom, creates an atmosphere of rejoicing that overrides the requirement to continue the fast. Unlike most Jewish fast days, only firstborns are required to fast on the Fast of the Firstborn.

Ta’anit Bechorot begins at dawn on Fri, 19 April 2019.

At 11:00am congregants are invited to join us at the fire pit behind CBI to burn the last bits of chametz they may have.

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Friday Noon Study Group
Apr 19 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, October 11, 12:00-1:00

The Noon Study group will NOT meet on Friday, October 11. 

Last week we discussed Chapter’s 10 and 11 Rabbi Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World.   Several of us agreed that these were the most lucid chapters that we’ve read so far–provided that we accept that the Hebrew Bible is a foundational text for Western Civilization.  Sacks contends that the Hebrew Bible is an “extended essay on human responsibility.”  These chapters begin his chronological demonstration of how biblical stories direct human ethics starting with the Book of Genesis.  Adam and Eve denied personal responsibility, shifting blame to one another and God.  Cain denies that responsibility is an imperative, asking “Am I my Brother’s Keeper?” Noah acted as though he were responsible only to himself and his family, not others.  The builders of the Tower of Babel usurped the role of God, thinking they were answerable to no one but themselves. It is not until Abraham and his plea for the inhabitants of Sodom that we see moral responsibility exercised.  This continues with the generation of Moses and the Israelites’ acceptance of the covenant at Sinai:  “We will do everything that the Lord has said.”  With that pledge human initiative combines with divine initiative–God may have begun the work, but we are asked to complete it. 
When we resume on October 18, we’ll take up Chapters 12 and 13:  “The Holy and the Good” and “The Monotheistic Imagination.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library (or the Social Hall if our group is too large).  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Apr
20
Sat
Youth Shabbat @ CBI
Apr 20 @ 10:45 am – 12:30 pm
Youth Shabbat @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

The third Saturday of each month, children, parents and youths of all ages are invited to join Josefa Briant in the small sanctuary for a kid-friendly, family-friendly introduction to the joy of Shabbat. Make sure to stick around for Shabbat kiddush for shmoozing and lunch!  

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Apr
21
Sun
Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle @ Congregation Beth HaTephila
Apr 21 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle @ Congregation Beth HaTephila | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infuing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us (usually) on the first and third Sunday of each month from 1pm – 3pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. Congregation Beth Ha Tephila, 43 North Libery Street in North Asheville.

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Apr
26
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
Apr 26 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, October 11, 12:00-1:00

The Noon Study group will NOT meet on Friday, October 11. 

Last week we discussed Chapter’s 10 and 11 Rabbi Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World.   Several of us agreed that these were the most lucid chapters that we’ve read so far–provided that we accept that the Hebrew Bible is a foundational text for Western Civilization.  Sacks contends that the Hebrew Bible is an “extended essay on human responsibility.”  These chapters begin his chronological demonstration of how biblical stories direct human ethics starting with the Book of Genesis.  Adam and Eve denied personal responsibility, shifting blame to one another and God.  Cain denies that responsibility is an imperative, asking “Am I my Brother’s Keeper?” Noah acted as though he were responsible only to himself and his family, not others.  The builders of the Tower of Babel usurped the role of God, thinking they were answerable to no one but themselves. It is not until Abraham and his plea for the inhabitants of Sodom that we see moral responsibility exercised.  This continues with the generation of Moses and the Israelites’ acceptance of the covenant at Sinai:  “We will do everything that the Lord has said.”  With that pledge human initiative combines with divine initiative–God may have begun the work, but we are asked to complete it. 
When we resume on October 18, we’ll take up Chapters 12 and 13:  “The Holy and the Good” and “The Monotheistic Imagination.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library (or the Social Hall if our group is too large).  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI
Apr 26 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Join CBI families and kids, members and visitors of all ages as we come together to welcome Shabbat with prayer, song and inspiration.

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Apr
28
Sun
Torah on Tap: Envisioning Judaism’s Future @ Archetype Brewing
Apr 28 @ 4:00 pm – 5:15 pm
Torah on Tap: Envisioning Judaism's Future @ Archetype Brewing | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

As a people, Jews have a long and storied past. Probelm is, we can often become obsessed with it. Our laws and texts, so many of the rabbis and scholars we quote and study week after week are not just from our past but from humanity’s distant past. In each generation, we find ourselves interpreting and reinterpreting laws and ancient wisdom in an effort to make it resonate once again for our time. And yet, all the while the future of the Jewish people continues to unfold day after day with many Jews oblivious to changes, large and small.

Beyond the demographers, Jewish professionals and cultural anthropologists, how much time and energy do we spend on envisioning our Jewish future? Join us for the April edition of Torah on Tap as we step bodly into the future of Judaism and discuss what is possible. Some topics up for discussion:

  •  Is there validity the dire projections of Judaism’s imminent demise as predicted by the 2013 Pew Report?
  • What are some of the successful and emerging models of Jewish engagement?
  • How is the role of the synagogue changing?

Please note, we will end at 5:15, to allow folks to get to CBI for the important Town Hall Meeting at 5:30.

Torah on Tap gives us a chance to learn, vent, share and, most of all, understand what 4,000 years of cultural development, debate and dialogue has to say about some of the issues that confront us today. Torah on Tap is free and open to all. Varying viewpoints are not only welcome, but encouraged.

In addition to drinks, Archetype also offers small, locally-made bites available for purchase, including Poppy Popcorn, Asheville Pretzel Company pretzels, and Hickory Nut Gap Farm meat sticks. Plenty of parking in the rear.

See you there!

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May
3
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
May 3 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, October 11, 12:00-1:00

The Noon Study group will NOT meet on Friday, October 11. 

Last week we discussed Chapter’s 10 and 11 Rabbi Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World.   Several of us agreed that these were the most lucid chapters that we’ve read so far–provided that we accept that the Hebrew Bible is a foundational text for Western Civilization.  Sacks contends that the Hebrew Bible is an “extended essay on human responsibility.”  These chapters begin his chronological demonstration of how biblical stories direct human ethics starting with the Book of Genesis.  Adam and Eve denied personal responsibility, shifting blame to one another and God.  Cain denies that responsibility is an imperative, asking “Am I my Brother’s Keeper?” Noah acted as though he were responsible only to himself and his family, not others.  The builders of the Tower of Babel usurped the role of God, thinking they were answerable to no one but themselves. It is not until Abraham and his plea for the inhabitants of Sodom that we see moral responsibility exercised.  This continues with the generation of Moses and the Israelites’ acceptance of the covenant at Sinai:  “We will do everything that the Lord has said.”  With that pledge human initiative combines with divine initiative–God may have begun the work, but we are asked to complete it. 
When we resume on October 18, we’ll take up Chapters 12 and 13:  “The Holy and the Good” and “The Monotheistic Imagination.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library (or the Social Hall if our group is too large).  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Shabbatluck at Ben & Hannah’s
May 3 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Welcome Shabbat with  your CBI family at the home of Hannah Limov & Ben Kohan in West Asheville.  Potluck dinner will be meat/pareve (no dairy!).  For details and to RSVP, click here.

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May
10
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
May 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, October 11, 12:00-1:00

The Noon Study group will NOT meet on Friday, October 11. 

Last week we discussed Chapter’s 10 and 11 Rabbi Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World.   Several of us agreed that these were the most lucid chapters that we’ve read so far–provided that we accept that the Hebrew Bible is a foundational text for Western Civilization.  Sacks contends that the Hebrew Bible is an “extended essay on human responsibility.”  These chapters begin his chronological demonstration of how biblical stories direct human ethics starting with the Book of Genesis.  Adam and Eve denied personal responsibility, shifting blame to one another and God.  Cain denies that responsibility is an imperative, asking “Am I my Brother’s Keeper?” Noah acted as though he were responsible only to himself and his family, not others.  The builders of the Tower of Babel usurped the role of God, thinking they were answerable to no one but themselves. It is not until Abraham and his plea for the inhabitants of Sodom that we see moral responsibility exercised.  This continues with the generation of Moses and the Israelites’ acceptance of the covenant at Sinai:  “We will do everything that the Lord has said.”  With that pledge human initiative combines with divine initiative–God may have begun the work, but we are asked to complete it. 
When we resume on October 18, we’ll take up Chapters 12 and 13:  “The Holy and the Good” and “The Monotheistic Imagination.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library (or the Social Hall if our group is too large).  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI
May 10 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Kabbalat Shabbat Services @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Join us in welcoming Shabbat with prayer and song.

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May
17
Fri
Friday Noon Study Group
May 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Friday Noon Study Group

Friday, October 11, 12:00-1:00

The Noon Study group will NOT meet on Friday, October 11. 

Last week we discussed Chapter’s 10 and 11 Rabbi Sacks’s To Heal a Fractured World.   Several of us agreed that these were the most lucid chapters that we’ve read so far–provided that we accept that the Hebrew Bible is a foundational text for Western Civilization.  Sacks contends that the Hebrew Bible is an “extended essay on human responsibility.”  These chapters begin his chronological demonstration of how biblical stories direct human ethics starting with the Book of Genesis.  Adam and Eve denied personal responsibility, shifting blame to one another and God.  Cain denies that responsibility is an imperative, asking “Am I my Brother’s Keeper?” Noah acted as though he were responsible only to himself and his family, not others.  The builders of the Tower of Babel usurped the role of God, thinking they were answerable to no one but themselves. It is not until Abraham and his plea for the inhabitants of Sodom that we see moral responsibility exercised.  This continues with the generation of Moses and the Israelites’ acceptance of the covenant at Sinai:  “We will do everything that the Lord has said.”  With that pledge human initiative combines with divine initiative–God may have begun the work, but we are asked to complete it. 
When we resume on October 18, we’ll take up Chapters 12 and 13:  “The Holy and the Good” and “The Monotheistic Imagination.” 
Our informal discussion group meets every Friday from 12-1, in the CBI Library (or the Social Hall if our group is too large).  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous Friday study group sessions.     Copies of Rabbi Sacks’s book are available at a variety of internet outlets.  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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May
18
Sat
Olivia Thomas Bat Mitzvah – Saturday Morning Services
May 18 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

The congregation is invited to celebrate with the Millsaps family as Olivia becomes Bat Mitzvah.

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Youth Shabbat @ CBI
May 18 @ 10:45 am – 12:30 pm
Youth Shabbat @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

The third Saturday of each month, children, parents and youths of all ages are invited to join Josefa Briant in the small sanctuary for a kid-friendly, family-friendly introduction to the joy of Shabbat. Make sure to stick around for Shabbat kiddush for shmoozing and lunch!  

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May
19
Sun
Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle @ Congregation Beth HaTephila
May 19 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle @ Congregation Beth HaTephila | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infuing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us (usually) on the first and third Sunday of each month from 1pm – 3pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. Congregation Beth Ha Tephila, 43 North Libery Street in North Asheville.

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May
22
Wed
Meet the Midrash
May 22 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Meet the Midrash is for those who want to make the regular study of the weekly Torah portion a part of their fixed practice.

Join Rabbi Goldstein each Wednesday around noon for a traditional interpretation of the Sages on the upcoming Torah portion or upcoming holidays.

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Film: Combatants for Peace
May 22 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Roberta Wall is going to introduce and screen the movie “Combatants for Peace” in the CBI social hall at 6:30 PM on Wednesday May 22nd.  With a 30 minute questions session afterwords, we should conclude at about 8:30.

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May
23
Thu
Why Are We Still Afraid?
May 23 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Why Are We Still Afraid?: A reporter’s 46-year story of Israel growing strong

By Mark Lavie

It’s Israel as you’ve never seen it before—forty-six years of life, conflict, people, and society from ground level as it happened, with context and depth, through the eyes of an award-winning American journalist who’s also an Israeli, husband, father, grandfather, Orthodox Jew, and soldier—proving that Israel is stronger than ever and needs to act like it. The book has four sections: conflict, society, people, and media. You’ll walk alongside the author as he interacts with Israel on many levels, encountering heroes and demagogues, leaders and followers, Jews and Arabs–and you’ll follow him to the conclusion that Israel cannot fix the Palestinians, but it can fix itself–and in its upcoming election, Israel’s emphasis should be on domestic problems and not exaggerated security threats.

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