CBI Events Calendar

Jan
27
Wed
American Jewish Life: The Words & Music of Allan Sherman
Jan 27 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

American Jewish Life in the Mid-Twentieth Century As Seen Through The Words and Music of Allan Sherman
Taught by Dr. Hal M. Lewis

Wednesdays in January, 4:00pm

Allan Sherman was an American Jewish comedy writer and song parodist. Known for his songs,
Hello Muddah, Hello Faddah; Harvey and Sheila; Sarah Jackman, and hundreds of others,
Sherman was a keen observer of the American Jewish scene in the decades of the 1950’s, 60’s
and early 70’s. In this four-part series we will (re-) listen to some of his most well-known
musical contributions and learn some of his lesser-known works, as well. Sherman’s music will
serve as the perfect background for analyzing several of the seminal trends in American Jewish
life during the middle of the twentieth century.

Register by emailing director@bethisraelnc.org by December 30.

 

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Jan
29
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Jan 29 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

 Friday, January 22, 12-1 

We began last week’s session with a focus on the role Ultra-Orthodox Judaism continues to play in legislating about such issues as women’s rights when it comes to issues of marriage and divorce, conversion, and determining who is a Jew.  While Ultra-Orthodox Jews account for only 13% of the Israeli population, they exert considerable influence on a number of issues.  This probably has much less to do with a largely secular Israeli population’s deference to biblical law and more to do with politics–the need to form coalitions in order to get any laws passed.  We also spent some time discussing how various Zionist ideologies contributed to the mishegas (craziness) of having no less than 17 parties represented in the Israeli Knesset.
Discussion last week also centered upon both the 1967 Six Day War and the 1973 Yom Kippur War and the impact these conflicts had on the development of the character and politics of Israelis and their attitudes regarding ceding land for peace, building settlements, etc. (polarized views between the Left and the Right, the Labor and Likud parties, the Peace Now and Greater Israel movements).  Along the way, we considered the valorization and/or vilification of such figures as Golda Meir, Menachem Begin, Shimon Peres, Yitzhak Shamir, Yitzhak Rabin, and Ariel Sharon.
This week, we’ll conclude our discussions of Zionism with a look at Chapter 10 and the Epilogue to Stanislawski’s Zionism: A Short Introduction (pp. 106-118).  This covers developments in Zionism in the last decade of the Twentieth Century and the first decades of the Twenty-first Century.  In addition, we’ll spend some time considering Israel’s economic miracle since 1992, definitions of anti-Zionist, anti-Semitic, and anti-Israel, and United Nations’ attitudes towards Israel. 
Our informal discussion group is held online every Friday from 12-1.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. If you have questions, or would like the Zoom link, please contact Jay Jacoby at  jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Jan
30
Sat
Torah Study with Justin Goldstein
Jan 30 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Join Justin Goldstein for an hour of Torah study and discussion of the week’s Torah portion.

All are welcome, link to join the Zoom meeting here.

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Jan
31
Sun
Online Torah on Tap
Jan 31 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
With so much of CBI’s programming unavoidably cancelled, we’re working hard to find ways we can support each other as a community when we can’t be together in person.

Please join me this Sunday, April 26, at 4:00pm, when we will be holding Torah on Tap via Zoom.

A link to the online discussion group is below.  Zoom is easy to use and will let us see and hear each other as we speak.  If you haven’t already downloaded Zoom to your computer or phone, you must do so before joining the meeting on Sunday at 4:00pm.  You only need to download Zoom once, after that you simply log in, always using the same Meeting ID: 819 7668 2790.  Easy instructions are below this message.

This is a temporary measure to keep us all connected while we can’t be together physically.

Alan Silverman

Torah on Tap Host

Instructions for Downloading Zoom

The first time you ever use Zoom on a computer, do the following:

Go to https://zoom.us
Hover over (don’t click) “RESOURCES” on the top right and then click “Download Zoom Client” from the drop-down menu that appears
Click “Download” under “Zoom Client for Meetings”
If it asks you to allow it to download “zoom.us”, click “Allow” or “Yes”
Open the downloaded file and follow the instructions to install Zoom on your computer

The first time you ever use Zoom on a smart phone, do the following:
Go to the App Store and find “Zoom Cloud Meetings” and download it (it is free)

Instructions for attending Torah on Tap on CBI’s Zoom Account:

Right before the start of services, either go to https://zoom.us on your computer or open your Zoom app on your smartphone
Click “Join a Meeting”
Type in this Meeting ID: 819 7668 2790 and click “Join”
If you’re using the computer and Zoom asks you to allow it to open “zoom.us”, click “Allow” or “Yes” or “Open” and then click “Join With Computer Audio”
If you’re using a smart phone and Zoom asks you to allow using the microphone/camera, allow it
If it says “Waiting for the host to start this meeting”, just wait a few minutes for Alan to start the meeting

Join us on the last Sunday of the month online for a refreshing and often provocative discussion. Each month, we take on a new topic – often ripped from the headlines of today’s news. We spend the first 45 minutes wrapping our arms around it, defining it, dissecting and analyzing it from various viewpoints. Then we spend the rest of the time discussing it from Judaism’s point of view.

  • What’s Judaism’s take on universal healthcare?
  • Would Moses walk the streets of Chicago today packing heat?
  • Is it okay to punch a white supremacist?

Torah on Tap gives us a chance to learn, vent, share and, most of all, understand what 4,000 years of cultural development, debate and dialogue has to say about some of the issues that confront us today. Torah on Tap is free and open to all. Varying viewpoints are not only welcome, but encouraged.

See you there!

 

 

 

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Feb
3
Wed
Anti-Semitism, White Supremacy and Racism
Feb 3 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Anti-Semitism, White Supremacy and Racism 
Wednesday, February 3, 7:00pm

All are invited to a Zoom discussion moderated by Deborah Miles.  Please read Eric K. Ward’s article before the discussion.  Zoom link to join discussion here.

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Feb
5
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Feb 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

 Friday, January 22, 12-1 

We began last week’s session with a focus on the role Ultra-Orthodox Judaism continues to play in legislating about such issues as women’s rights when it comes to issues of marriage and divorce, conversion, and determining who is a Jew.  While Ultra-Orthodox Jews account for only 13% of the Israeli population, they exert considerable influence on a number of issues.  This probably has much less to do with a largely secular Israeli population’s deference to biblical law and more to do with politics–the need to form coalitions in order to get any laws passed.  We also spent some time discussing how various Zionist ideologies contributed to the mishegas (craziness) of having no less than 17 parties represented in the Israeli Knesset.
Discussion last week also centered upon both the 1967 Six Day War and the 1973 Yom Kippur War and the impact these conflicts had on the development of the character and politics of Israelis and their attitudes regarding ceding land for peace, building settlements, etc. (polarized views between the Left and the Right, the Labor and Likud parties, the Peace Now and Greater Israel movements).  Along the way, we considered the valorization and/or vilification of such figures as Golda Meir, Menachem Begin, Shimon Peres, Yitzhak Shamir, Yitzhak Rabin, and Ariel Sharon.
This week, we’ll conclude our discussions of Zionism with a look at Chapter 10 and the Epilogue to Stanislawski’s Zionism: A Short Introduction (pp. 106-118).  This covers developments in Zionism in the last decade of the Twentieth Century and the first decades of the Twenty-first Century.  In addition, we’ll spend some time considering Israel’s economic miracle since 1992, definitions of anti-Zionist, anti-Semitic, and anti-Israel, and United Nations’ attitudes towards Israel. 
Our informal discussion group is held online every Friday from 12-1.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. If you have questions, or would like the Zoom link, please contact Jay Jacoby at  jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Feb
12
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Feb 12 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

 Friday, January 22, 12-1 

We began last week’s session with a focus on the role Ultra-Orthodox Judaism continues to play in legislating about such issues as women’s rights when it comes to issues of marriage and divorce, conversion, and determining who is a Jew.  While Ultra-Orthodox Jews account for only 13% of the Israeli population, they exert considerable influence on a number of issues.  This probably has much less to do with a largely secular Israeli population’s deference to biblical law and more to do with politics–the need to form coalitions in order to get any laws passed.  We also spent some time discussing how various Zionist ideologies contributed to the mishegas (craziness) of having no less than 17 parties represented in the Israeli Knesset.
Discussion last week also centered upon both the 1967 Six Day War and the 1973 Yom Kippur War and the impact these conflicts had on the development of the character and politics of Israelis and their attitudes regarding ceding land for peace, building settlements, etc. (polarized views between the Left and the Right, the Labor and Likud parties, the Peace Now and Greater Israel movements).  Along the way, we considered the valorization and/or vilification of such figures as Golda Meir, Menachem Begin, Shimon Peres, Yitzhak Shamir, Yitzhak Rabin, and Ariel Sharon.
This week, we’ll conclude our discussions of Zionism with a look at Chapter 10 and the Epilogue to Stanislawski’s Zionism: A Short Introduction (pp. 106-118).  This covers developments in Zionism in the last decade of the Twentieth Century and the first decades of the Twenty-first Century.  In addition, we’ll spend some time considering Israel’s economic miracle since 1992, definitions of anti-Zionist, anti-Semitic, and anti-Israel, and United Nations’ attitudes towards Israel. 
Our informal discussion group is held online every Friday from 12-1.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. If you have questions, or would like the Zoom link, please contact Jay Jacoby at  jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Feb
13
Sat
Torah Study with Justin Goldstein
Feb 13 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Join Justin Goldstein for an hour of Torah study and discussion of the week’s Torah portion.

All are welcome, link to join the Zoom meeting here.

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Feb
19
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Feb 19 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

 Friday, January 22, 12-1 

We began last week’s session with a focus on the role Ultra-Orthodox Judaism continues to play in legislating about such issues as women’s rights when it comes to issues of marriage and divorce, conversion, and determining who is a Jew.  While Ultra-Orthodox Jews account for only 13% of the Israeli population, they exert considerable influence on a number of issues.  This probably has much less to do with a largely secular Israeli population’s deference to biblical law and more to do with politics–the need to form coalitions in order to get any laws passed.  We also spent some time discussing how various Zionist ideologies contributed to the mishegas (craziness) of having no less than 17 parties represented in the Israeli Knesset.
Discussion last week also centered upon both the 1967 Six Day War and the 1973 Yom Kippur War and the impact these conflicts had on the development of the character and politics of Israelis and their attitudes regarding ceding land for peace, building settlements, etc. (polarized views between the Left and the Right, the Labor and Likud parties, the Peace Now and Greater Israel movements).  Along the way, we considered the valorization and/or vilification of such figures as Golda Meir, Menachem Begin, Shimon Peres, Yitzhak Shamir, Yitzhak Rabin, and Ariel Sharon.
This week, we’ll conclude our discussions of Zionism with a look at Chapter 10 and the Epilogue to Stanislawski’s Zionism: A Short Introduction (pp. 106-118).  This covers developments in Zionism in the last decade of the Twentieth Century and the first decades of the Twenty-first Century.  In addition, we’ll spend some time considering Israel’s economic miracle since 1992, definitions of anti-Zionist, anti-Semitic, and anti-Israel, and United Nations’ attitudes towards Israel. 
Our informal discussion group is held online every Friday from 12-1.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. If you have questions, or would like the Zoom link, please contact Jay Jacoby at  jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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Feb
26
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Feb 26 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

 Friday, January 22, 12-1 

We began last week’s session with a focus on the role Ultra-Orthodox Judaism continues to play in legislating about such issues as women’s rights when it comes to issues of marriage and divorce, conversion, and determining who is a Jew.  While Ultra-Orthodox Jews account for only 13% of the Israeli population, they exert considerable influence on a number of issues.  This probably has much less to do with a largely secular Israeli population’s deference to biblical law and more to do with politics–the need to form coalitions in order to get any laws passed.  We also spent some time discussing how various Zionist ideologies contributed to the mishegas (craziness) of having no less than 17 parties represented in the Israeli Knesset.
Discussion last week also centered upon both the 1967 Six Day War and the 1973 Yom Kippur War and the impact these conflicts had on the development of the character and politics of Israelis and their attitudes regarding ceding land for peace, building settlements, etc. (polarized views between the Left and the Right, the Labor and Likud parties, the Peace Now and Greater Israel movements).  Along the way, we considered the valorization and/or vilification of such figures as Golda Meir, Menachem Begin, Shimon Peres, Yitzhak Shamir, Yitzhak Rabin, and Ariel Sharon.
This week, we’ll conclude our discussions of Zionism with a look at Chapter 10 and the Epilogue to Stanislawski’s Zionism: A Short Introduction (pp. 106-118).  This covers developments in Zionism in the last decade of the Twentieth Century and the first decades of the Twenty-first Century.  In addition, we’ll spend some time considering Israel’s economic miracle since 1992, definitions of anti-Zionist, anti-Semitic, and anti-Israel, and United Nations’ attitudes towards Israel. 
Our informal discussion group is held online every Friday from 12-1.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise or attendance at previous noon study group discussions. If you have questions, or would like the Zoom link, please contact Jay Jacoby at  jbjacoby@uncc.edu.

 

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