CBI Events Calendar

Dec
10
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Dec 10 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Friday December 10, 12-1

When our group met on December 3, we had a lively discussion of Chapter 16 and most of Chapter 17 in Genesis.  Among the issues we discussed were

  • Sarai’s apparent infertility and her request that Abram take Hagar, her Egyptian slave, as a wife so that he could have an heir.  “Abram heeded Sarai’s voice” (16:2), perhaps to insure shalom bais (domestic tranquility).

  • When Hagar becomes pregnant with Abram’s child, Sarai severely chides Abram because, as a barren woman, she had become an object of  scorn in her slave’s eyes. (Oddly, this attachment of blame to Abram does not get discussed The Torah: A Woman’s Commentary).  Abram tells Sarai she can deal with Hagar however she wants to, and Sarai treats her badly.

  • An angel of the Lord comes to inform Hagar, who has run away to the wilderness to escape the ill-treatment.  The angel tells her to return to her mistress.  This advice reinforces the caste system by subjugating Hagar into accommodating the existing powers.

  • The angel further makes promises to Hagar on behalf of God, letting her know that her “descendants shall be too numerous to count.”  The language clearly echoes that of the promises God made to Abram.  We noted that, probably for reasons related to gender, an angel, instead of God, made this annunciation of birth (a type-scene in the history of heroes from many different cultures; see http://www.arts.magic-nation.co.uk/annunciation13.htm)

  • We noted that, while the angel’s prediction that Hagar’s son, Ishmael, “shall be a wild ass of a man” positively connotes animal virility, the prediction that Ishmael will dwell “in opposition to all his kin” certainly seems less positive–setting up a binary opposition between Ishmael and Isaac like the one established between Sarai and Hagar.

  • Thirteen years after the birth of Ishmael, God reinforces his covenant with Abram (changing his name from Abram–“exalted father”–to Abraham–“father of multitudes”).  God asks Abraham to seal the deal via the rite of circumcision–a critical feature of Israelite self-identification.  We concluded our discussion by noting that since this circumcision ritual (brit milah) was limited to male participants, contemporary Jewish women have developed their own ceremonies for welcoming themselves into the covenant (brit rechitzah; see https://www.kveller.com/article/alternative-rituals-for-naming-ceremonies/).

When we meet on December 1o, the group will look at Genesis 17:16 through Genesis 19.  This covers God’s promises to Sarai/ Sarah, God’s preference for Isaac over Ishmael, a second birth annunciation–this time about Isaac and Sarah’s reaction, God’s plan for Sodom, Abraham’s attempt to intercede, and the misadventures of Lot and his family.

Our informal group meets via Zoom every Friday from 12-1. Check the CBI web page for a link.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise.  Please bring whatever copy of the Bible you might have (the more different translations the livelier the discussion).  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu

 

 
 

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Dec
17
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Dec 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Friday December 10, 12-1

When our group met on December 3, we had a lively discussion of Chapter 16 and most of Chapter 17 in Genesis.  Among the issues we discussed were

  • Sarai’s apparent infertility and her request that Abram take Hagar, her Egyptian slave, as a wife so that he could have an heir.  “Abram heeded Sarai’s voice” (16:2), perhaps to insure shalom bais (domestic tranquility).

  • When Hagar becomes pregnant with Abram’s child, Sarai severely chides Abram because, as a barren woman, she had become an object of  scorn in her slave’s eyes. (Oddly, this attachment of blame to Abram does not get discussed The Torah: A Woman’s Commentary).  Abram tells Sarai she can deal with Hagar however she wants to, and Sarai treats her badly.

  • An angel of the Lord comes to inform Hagar, who has run away to the wilderness to escape the ill-treatment.  The angel tells her to return to her mistress.  This advice reinforces the caste system by subjugating Hagar into accommodating the existing powers.

  • The angel further makes promises to Hagar on behalf of God, letting her know that her “descendants shall be too numerous to count.”  The language clearly echoes that of the promises God made to Abram.  We noted that, probably for reasons related to gender, an angel, instead of God, made this annunciation of birth (a type-scene in the history of heroes from many different cultures; see http://www.arts.magic-nation.co.uk/annunciation13.htm)

  • We noted that, while the angel’s prediction that Hagar’s son, Ishmael, “shall be a wild ass of a man” positively connotes animal virility, the prediction that Ishmael will dwell “in opposition to all his kin” certainly seems less positive–setting up a binary opposition between Ishmael and Isaac like the one established between Sarai and Hagar.

  • Thirteen years after the birth of Ishmael, God reinforces his covenant with Abram (changing his name from Abram–“exalted father”–to Abraham–“father of multitudes”).  God asks Abraham to seal the deal via the rite of circumcision–a critical feature of Israelite self-identification.  We concluded our discussion by noting that since this circumcision ritual (brit milah) was limited to male participants, contemporary Jewish women have developed their own ceremonies for welcoming themselves into the covenant (brit rechitzah; see https://www.kveller.com/article/alternative-rituals-for-naming-ceremonies/).

When we meet on December 1o, the group will look at Genesis 17:16 through Genesis 19.  This covers God’s promises to Sarai/ Sarah, God’s preference for Isaac over Ishmael, a second birth annunciation–this time about Isaac and Sarah’s reaction, God’s plan for Sodom, Abraham’s attempt to intercede, and the misadventures of Lot and his family.

Our informal group meets via Zoom every Friday from 12-1. Check the CBI web page for a link.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise.  Please bring whatever copy of the Bible you might have (the more different translations the livelier the discussion).  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu

 

 
 

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Dec
19
Sun
Online Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle
Dec 19 @ 2:30 pm

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infusing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us via Zoom (every Sunday from 2:30pm – 4pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. Please contact Linda Wolf at linda@networktype.com for the online meeting information.

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Dec
24
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Dec 24 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Friday December 10, 12-1

When our group met on December 3, we had a lively discussion of Chapter 16 and most of Chapter 17 in Genesis.  Among the issues we discussed were

  • Sarai’s apparent infertility and her request that Abram take Hagar, her Egyptian slave, as a wife so that he could have an heir.  “Abram heeded Sarai’s voice” (16:2), perhaps to insure shalom bais (domestic tranquility).

  • When Hagar becomes pregnant with Abram’s child, Sarai severely chides Abram because, as a barren woman, she had become an object of  scorn in her slave’s eyes. (Oddly, this attachment of blame to Abram does not get discussed The Torah: A Woman’s Commentary).  Abram tells Sarai she can deal with Hagar however she wants to, and Sarai treats her badly.

  • An angel of the Lord comes to inform Hagar, who has run away to the wilderness to escape the ill-treatment.  The angel tells her to return to her mistress.  This advice reinforces the caste system by subjugating Hagar into accommodating the existing powers.

  • The angel further makes promises to Hagar on behalf of God, letting her know that her “descendants shall be too numerous to count.”  The language clearly echoes that of the promises God made to Abram.  We noted that, probably for reasons related to gender, an angel, instead of God, made this annunciation of birth (a type-scene in the history of heroes from many different cultures; see http://www.arts.magic-nation.co.uk/annunciation13.htm)

  • We noted that, while the angel’s prediction that Hagar’s son, Ishmael, “shall be a wild ass of a man” positively connotes animal virility, the prediction that Ishmael will dwell “in opposition to all his kin” certainly seems less positive–setting up a binary opposition between Ishmael and Isaac like the one established between Sarai and Hagar.

  • Thirteen years after the birth of Ishmael, God reinforces his covenant with Abram (changing his name from Abram–“exalted father”–to Abraham–“father of multitudes”).  God asks Abraham to seal the deal via the rite of circumcision–a critical feature of Israelite self-identification.  We concluded our discussion by noting that since this circumcision ritual (brit milah) was limited to male participants, contemporary Jewish women have developed their own ceremonies for welcoming themselves into the covenant (brit rechitzah; see https://www.kveller.com/article/alternative-rituals-for-naming-ceremonies/).

When we meet on December 1o, the group will look at Genesis 17:16 through Genesis 19.  This covers God’s promises to Sarai/ Sarah, God’s preference for Isaac over Ishmael, a second birth annunciation–this time about Isaac and Sarah’s reaction, God’s plan for Sodom, Abraham’s attempt to intercede, and the misadventures of Lot and his family.

Our informal group meets via Zoom every Friday from 12-1. Check the CBI web page for a link.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise.  Please bring whatever copy of the Bible you might have (the more different translations the livelier the discussion).  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu

 

 
 

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Dec
26
Sun
Torah on Tap @ CBI
Dec 26 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Torah on Tap @ CBI | Asheville | North Carolina | United States

Take this job and shove it!”

The workplace has always had tension between what employees want and need, and what employers are will to give. But this time is different. The “Great Resignation” feels like more of a revolt, with tens of millions of workers looking for a better work/life balance. Interestingly (but not surprisingly), Torah has a lot to say about how to navigate this delicate issue. Join Alan Silverman and Rabbi Mitch for a fascinating look at what’s behind the Great Resignation and how our tradition foresaw it. 4pm at the shul. We’ll meet inside. Please feel free to bring you beverage of choice. Hope to see you there.

Join us for Torah on Tap this Sunday (4pm – 5:30) as we explore the opportunities and obstacles of change. Share your own story of growth, learn the most common impediments to change and how, with the help of our Jewish traditions, we can re-frame what it means to change – making it easier and more meaningful.

We’ll meet by the stream beside the CBI parking lot. Bring your beverage of choice, a lawn chair and a caring, open mind. Come as you are. Leave different.

 

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Dec
31
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Dec 31 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Friday December 10, 12-1

When our group met on December 3, we had a lively discussion of Chapter 16 and most of Chapter 17 in Genesis.  Among the issues we discussed were

  • Sarai’s apparent infertility and her request that Abram take Hagar, her Egyptian slave, as a wife so that he could have an heir.  “Abram heeded Sarai’s voice” (16:2), perhaps to insure shalom bais (domestic tranquility).

  • When Hagar becomes pregnant with Abram’s child, Sarai severely chides Abram because, as a barren woman, she had become an object of  scorn in her slave’s eyes. (Oddly, this attachment of blame to Abram does not get discussed The Torah: A Woman’s Commentary).  Abram tells Sarai she can deal with Hagar however she wants to, and Sarai treats her badly.

  • An angel of the Lord comes to inform Hagar, who has run away to the wilderness to escape the ill-treatment.  The angel tells her to return to her mistress.  This advice reinforces the caste system by subjugating Hagar into accommodating the existing powers.

  • The angel further makes promises to Hagar on behalf of God, letting her know that her “descendants shall be too numerous to count.”  The language clearly echoes that of the promises God made to Abram.  We noted that, probably for reasons related to gender, an angel, instead of God, made this annunciation of birth (a type-scene in the history of heroes from many different cultures; see http://www.arts.magic-nation.co.uk/annunciation13.htm)

  • We noted that, while the angel’s prediction that Hagar’s son, Ishmael, “shall be a wild ass of a man” positively connotes animal virility, the prediction that Ishmael will dwell “in opposition to all his kin” certainly seems less positive–setting up a binary opposition between Ishmael and Isaac like the one established between Sarai and Hagar.

  • Thirteen years after the birth of Ishmael, God reinforces his covenant with Abram (changing his name from Abram–“exalted father”–to Abraham–“father of multitudes”).  God asks Abraham to seal the deal via the rite of circumcision–a critical feature of Israelite self-identification.  We concluded our discussion by noting that since this circumcision ritual (brit milah) was limited to male participants, contemporary Jewish women have developed their own ceremonies for welcoming themselves into the covenant (brit rechitzah; see https://www.kveller.com/article/alternative-rituals-for-naming-ceremonies/).

When we meet on December 1o, the group will look at Genesis 17:16 through Genesis 19.  This covers God’s promises to Sarai/ Sarah, God’s preference for Isaac over Ishmael, a second birth annunciation–this time about Isaac and Sarah’s reaction, God’s plan for Sodom, Abraham’s attempt to intercede, and the misadventures of Lot and his family.

Our informal group meets via Zoom every Friday from 12-1. Check the CBI web page for a link.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise.  Please bring whatever copy of the Bible you might have (the more different translations the livelier the discussion).  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu

 

 
 

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Jan
2
Sun
Online Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle
Jan 2 @ 2:30 pm

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infusing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us via Zoom (every Sunday from 2:30pm – 4pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. Please contact Linda Wolf at linda@networktype.com for the online meeting information.

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Jan
7
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Jan 7 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Friday December 10, 12-1

When our group met on December 3, we had a lively discussion of Chapter 16 and most of Chapter 17 in Genesis.  Among the issues we discussed were

  • Sarai’s apparent infertility and her request that Abram take Hagar, her Egyptian slave, as a wife so that he could have an heir.  “Abram heeded Sarai’s voice” (16:2), perhaps to insure shalom bais (domestic tranquility).

  • When Hagar becomes pregnant with Abram’s child, Sarai severely chides Abram because, as a barren woman, she had become an object of  scorn in her slave’s eyes. (Oddly, this attachment of blame to Abram does not get discussed The Torah: A Woman’s Commentary).  Abram tells Sarai she can deal with Hagar however she wants to, and Sarai treats her badly.

  • An angel of the Lord comes to inform Hagar, who has run away to the wilderness to escape the ill-treatment.  The angel tells her to return to her mistress.  This advice reinforces the caste system by subjugating Hagar into accommodating the existing powers.

  • The angel further makes promises to Hagar on behalf of God, letting her know that her “descendants shall be too numerous to count.”  The language clearly echoes that of the promises God made to Abram.  We noted that, probably for reasons related to gender, an angel, instead of God, made this annunciation of birth (a type-scene in the history of heroes from many different cultures; see http://www.arts.magic-nation.co.uk/annunciation13.htm)

  • We noted that, while the angel’s prediction that Hagar’s son, Ishmael, “shall be a wild ass of a man” positively connotes animal virility, the prediction that Ishmael will dwell “in opposition to all his kin” certainly seems less positive–setting up a binary opposition between Ishmael and Isaac like the one established between Sarai and Hagar.

  • Thirteen years after the birth of Ishmael, God reinforces his covenant with Abram (changing his name from Abram–“exalted father”–to Abraham–“father of multitudes”).  God asks Abraham to seal the deal via the rite of circumcision–a critical feature of Israelite self-identification.  We concluded our discussion by noting that since this circumcision ritual (brit milah) was limited to male participants, contemporary Jewish women have developed their own ceremonies for welcoming themselves into the covenant (brit rechitzah; see https://www.kveller.com/article/alternative-rituals-for-naming-ceremonies/).

When we meet on December 1o, the group will look at Genesis 17:16 through Genesis 19.  This covers God’s promises to Sarai/ Sarah, God’s preference for Isaac over Ishmael, a second birth annunciation–this time about Isaac and Sarah’s reaction, God’s plan for Sodom, Abraham’s attempt to intercede, and the misadventures of Lot and his family.

Our informal group meets via Zoom every Friday from 12-1. Check the CBI web page for a link.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise.  Please bring whatever copy of the Bible you might have (the more different translations the livelier the discussion).  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu

 

 
 

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Jan
14
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Jan 14 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Friday December 10, 12-1

When our group met on December 3, we had a lively discussion of Chapter 16 and most of Chapter 17 in Genesis.  Among the issues we discussed were

  • Sarai’s apparent infertility and her request that Abram take Hagar, her Egyptian slave, as a wife so that he could have an heir.  “Abram heeded Sarai’s voice” (16:2), perhaps to insure shalom bais (domestic tranquility).

  • When Hagar becomes pregnant with Abram’s child, Sarai severely chides Abram because, as a barren woman, she had become an object of  scorn in her slave’s eyes. (Oddly, this attachment of blame to Abram does not get discussed The Torah: A Woman’s Commentary).  Abram tells Sarai she can deal with Hagar however she wants to, and Sarai treats her badly.

  • An angel of the Lord comes to inform Hagar, who has run away to the wilderness to escape the ill-treatment.  The angel tells her to return to her mistress.  This advice reinforces the caste system by subjugating Hagar into accommodating the existing powers.

  • The angel further makes promises to Hagar on behalf of God, letting her know that her “descendants shall be too numerous to count.”  The language clearly echoes that of the promises God made to Abram.  We noted that, probably for reasons related to gender, an angel, instead of God, made this annunciation of birth (a type-scene in the history of heroes from many different cultures; see http://www.arts.magic-nation.co.uk/annunciation13.htm)

  • We noted that, while the angel’s prediction that Hagar’s son, Ishmael, “shall be a wild ass of a man” positively connotes animal virility, the prediction that Ishmael will dwell “in opposition to all his kin” certainly seems less positive–setting up a binary opposition between Ishmael and Isaac like the one established between Sarai and Hagar.

  • Thirteen years after the birth of Ishmael, God reinforces his covenant with Abram (changing his name from Abram–“exalted father”–to Abraham–“father of multitudes”).  God asks Abraham to seal the deal via the rite of circumcision–a critical feature of Israelite self-identification.  We concluded our discussion by noting that since this circumcision ritual (brit milah) was limited to male participants, contemporary Jewish women have developed their own ceremonies for welcoming themselves into the covenant (brit rechitzah; see https://www.kveller.com/article/alternative-rituals-for-naming-ceremonies/).

When we meet on December 1o, the group will look at Genesis 17:16 through Genesis 19.  This covers God’s promises to Sarai/ Sarah, God’s preference for Isaac over Ishmael, a second birth annunciation–this time about Isaac and Sarah’s reaction, God’s plan for Sodom, Abraham’s attempt to intercede, and the misadventures of Lot and his family.

Our informal group meets via Zoom every Friday from 12-1. Check the CBI web page for a link.  All are welcome to join us, regardless of their level of expertise.  Please bring whatever copy of the Bible you might have (the more different translations the livelier the discussion).  If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu

 

 
 

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Jan
16
Sun
Online Jewish Meditation & Chant Circle
Jan 16 @ 2:30 pm

Just as healthy foods nourish us through the blood stream, so Jewish meditation nourishes our “soul stream.” Meditation can be transformative, taking us from the intellectual awareness of ourselves to a deeper spiritual practice that links us to Judaism in the most profound way. Each mitzvah, holy day and cycle of life has its own rhythm, nuance, taste and character. Jewish meditation is a practice of infusing their essence into our daily spiritual lives.

Ready to give it a try? Join us via Zoom (every Sunday from 2:30pm – 4pm. No previous meditation experience necessary.  This opportunity is free and open to all. Please contact Linda Wolf at linda@networktype.com for the online meeting information.

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