In-person & Online Friday Noon Study Group

When:
August 19, 2022 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
2022-08-19T12:00:00-04:00
2022-08-19T13:00:00-04:00
Cost:
Free
In-person & Online Friday Noon Study Group

August 19 12-1

When our weekly Study Group resumes on August 19, we will discuss the Jewish folk legend of the Lamed Vavnik–a story with origins in Torah and Talmud that has influenced such contemporary novels as Nicole Krauss’s  The History of Love and such films as the Coen brothers’ The Big Lebowski.  According to the legend, there are, at any given time, 36 righteous individuals upon whose merits the world continues to exist.  The number 36 is represented in Hebrew as lamed vav.  Those who wish to participate in our discussion on August 19, might want to take a look at a few of the following resources:
General Information:
https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/lamed-vav-x1e92-addikim
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tzadikim_Nistarim
https://www.splicetoday.com/pop-culture/the-lamed-vavnik-and-popular-culture
            http://ejmmm2007.blogspot.com/2009/03/lamed-vavniks-thirty-six-righteous-who.html
https://forward.com/culture/13406/the-thirty-six-who-save-the-world-01872/
https://www.matthewkressel.net/2015/10/13/36-days-of-judaic-myth-day-36-the-lamed-vav-the-thirty-six-hidden-righteous/
https://ohr.edu/2442
Stories about Lamed Vovniks:
https://blogs.timesofisrael.com/36-lamed-vovnick-stories-1/
https://www.naaleh.com/the-hidden-light/?hilite=%27topic%27
https://www.reddit.com/r/nonduality/comments/1r3y9f/the_lamed_vovnik_tale_as_told_by_speed_levitch/
Catholics on Lamed Vovniks
https://www.vermontcatholic.org/uncategorized/hidden-saints-the-legend-of-the-lamed-vavniks/
https://www.redlandsdailyfacts.com/2012/05/19/the-legend-of-the-36-righteous-men/
When our group meets on Friday, August 26, we will begin our  exploration of Andre Schwarz-Bart’s novel, The Last of the Just, a book with roots in the lamed-vavnik legend.  This post-WWII novel, which was awarded France’s highest literary prize in 1959, follows the Levy family over eight centuries, from York, England in the 1100s until the Eastern European Holocaust.  The novel has been described as an enduring classic that reminds us “how easily torn is the precious fabric of civilization, and how destructive are the consequences of dumb hatred.”  While, as the preceding quote suggests, Schwarz-Bart’s novel is unsettling, it provides much food for thought.
Now in its 23rd year, our informal discussion group meets in person from 12-1 in CBI’s small chapel (with an option on Zoom for those who cannot attend in person).  All are welcome to attend regardless of their level of expertise.   If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.
 

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

 
 

Sharing is caring