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There is so much that 4,000 years of tradition and wisdom can teach us.  Young or old, observant or not-so-much; whether you already know a lot or are just starting out – you’re not alone. Jump in. No wrong answers –

"With the knowledge and empathy I have gained at the Friday Study Group, my understanding of life has also grown. We are a community where I can live my values."-Carol Cohen

 This week's learning

Sep
30
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Sep 30 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Online Friday Noon Study Group

Friday Noon Study Group September 30 12-1

Last Friday, our group rode a roller coaster with Ernie Levy, examining the ups and downs of his life as portrayed in Chapter 5 and the beginning of Chapter 6 of The Last of the Just: 
  • his two-year-long recuperation following his suicide attempt
  • his service as a physical protector of his younger brother
  • his family’s escape to Montmorency, France when Nazis began burning books/rounding up Jews in Stillenstadt
  • his enlistment in the French Army in order to procure certificates that would protect his family from deportation
  • his family being deported to French transit camp at Gurs, and, following the surrender of the French Army, their deportation to an extermination camp
  • his wanderings throughout Vichy France wherein he imagines himself to be, and behaves like, a dog continuing his self-abasement
  • his return to Nazi-occupied Paris where he lodges with members of the Old Zemyock Association and sews on the yellow Jewish star “with pleasure”
  • The liquidation of the Jewish ghetto in Paris and his efforts to assist, Golda, a lame Jewish girl
This Friday, we will pick up where we left off in Chapter 6, starting with Ernie’s relationship with, and eventual marriage to, Golda (was it love?  pity? a manifestation of Ernie’s potential savior complex?).  We’ll look at the deportation of Golda and her family to Drancy (a transit camp) and Ernie’s insistence that he also be admitted there (where he his tortured).  We’ll then look at the last chapter, “Never Again,” which painfully details Ernie’s experience in a Nazi death camp.  Once again, we’ll take up the question of what compelled Ernie (the last of the just) to risk his life by surrendering himself to Nazi-occupied France, Drancy, and Auschwitz.
Now in its 23rd year, our informal discussion group meets via Zoom every Friday from 12-1.  Please note this change (we will reconsider resuming in-person meetings in CBI’s small chapel  starting in October).  All are welcome to attend regardless of their level of expertise.   If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.
 

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

 
 

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Oct
7
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Oct 7 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Online Friday Noon Study Group

Friday Noon Study Group September 30 12-1

Last Friday, our group rode a roller coaster with Ernie Levy, examining the ups and downs of his life as portrayed in Chapter 5 and the beginning of Chapter 6 of The Last of the Just: 
  • his two-year-long recuperation following his suicide attempt
  • his service as a physical protector of his younger brother
  • his family’s escape to Montmorency, France when Nazis began burning books/rounding up Jews in Stillenstadt
  • his enlistment in the French Army in order to procure certificates that would protect his family from deportation
  • his family being deported to French transit camp at Gurs, and, following the surrender of the French Army, their deportation to an extermination camp
  • his wanderings throughout Vichy France wherein he imagines himself to be, and behaves like, a dog continuing his self-abasement
  • his return to Nazi-occupied Paris where he lodges with members of the Old Zemyock Association and sews on the yellow Jewish star “with pleasure”
  • The liquidation of the Jewish ghetto in Paris and his efforts to assist, Golda, a lame Jewish girl
This Friday, we will pick up where we left off in Chapter 6, starting with Ernie’s relationship with, and eventual marriage to, Golda (was it love?  pity? a manifestation of Ernie’s potential savior complex?).  We’ll look at the deportation of Golda and her family to Drancy (a transit camp) and Ernie’s insistence that he also be admitted there (where he his tortured).  We’ll then look at the last chapter, “Never Again,” which painfully details Ernie’s experience in a Nazi death camp.  Once again, we’ll take up the question of what compelled Ernie (the last of the just) to risk his life by surrendering himself to Nazi-occupied France, Drancy, and Auschwitz.
Now in its 23rd year, our informal discussion group meets via Zoom every Friday from 12-1.  Please note this change (we will reconsider resuming in-person meetings in CBI’s small chapel  starting in October).  All are welcome to attend regardless of their level of expertise.   If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.
 

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

 
 

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Oct
14
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Oct 14 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Online Friday Noon Study Group

Friday Noon Study Group September 30 12-1

Last Friday, our group rode a roller coaster with Ernie Levy, examining the ups and downs of his life as portrayed in Chapter 5 and the beginning of Chapter 6 of The Last of the Just: 
  • his two-year-long recuperation following his suicide attempt
  • his service as a physical protector of his younger brother
  • his family’s escape to Montmorency, France when Nazis began burning books/rounding up Jews in Stillenstadt
  • his enlistment in the French Army in order to procure certificates that would protect his family from deportation
  • his family being deported to French transit camp at Gurs, and, following the surrender of the French Army, their deportation to an extermination camp
  • his wanderings throughout Vichy France wherein he imagines himself to be, and behaves like, a dog continuing his self-abasement
  • his return to Nazi-occupied Paris where he lodges with members of the Old Zemyock Association and sews on the yellow Jewish star “with pleasure”
  • The liquidation of the Jewish ghetto in Paris and his efforts to assist, Golda, a lame Jewish girl
This Friday, we will pick up where we left off in Chapter 6, starting with Ernie’s relationship with, and eventual marriage to, Golda (was it love?  pity? a manifestation of Ernie’s potential savior complex?).  We’ll look at the deportation of Golda and her family to Drancy (a transit camp) and Ernie’s insistence that he also be admitted there (where he his tortured).  We’ll then look at the last chapter, “Never Again,” which painfully details Ernie’s experience in a Nazi death camp.  Once again, we’ll take up the question of what compelled Ernie (the last of the just) to risk his life by surrendering himself to Nazi-occupied France, Drancy, and Auschwitz.
Now in its 23rd year, our informal discussion group meets via Zoom every Friday from 12-1.  Please note this change (we will reconsider resuming in-person meetings in CBI’s small chapel  starting in October).  All are welcome to attend regardless of their level of expertise.   If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.
 

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

 
 

Sharing is caring
Oct
21
Fri
Online Friday Noon Study Group
Oct 21 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Online Friday Noon Study Group

Friday Noon Study Group September 30 12-1

Last Friday, our group rode a roller coaster with Ernie Levy, examining the ups and downs of his life as portrayed in Chapter 5 and the beginning of Chapter 6 of The Last of the Just: 
  • his two-year-long recuperation following his suicide attempt
  • his service as a physical protector of his younger brother
  • his family’s escape to Montmorency, France when Nazis began burning books/rounding up Jews in Stillenstadt
  • his enlistment in the French Army in order to procure certificates that would protect his family from deportation
  • his family being deported to French transit camp at Gurs, and, following the surrender of the French Army, their deportation to an extermination camp
  • his wanderings throughout Vichy France wherein he imagines himself to be, and behaves like, a dog continuing his self-abasement
  • his return to Nazi-occupied Paris where he lodges with members of the Old Zemyock Association and sews on the yellow Jewish star “with pleasure”
  • The liquidation of the Jewish ghetto in Paris and his efforts to assist, Golda, a lame Jewish girl
This Friday, we will pick up where we left off in Chapter 6, starting with Ernie’s relationship with, and eventual marriage to, Golda (was it love?  pity? a manifestation of Ernie’s potential savior complex?).  We’ll look at the deportation of Golda and her family to Drancy (a transit camp) and Ernie’s insistence that he also be admitted there (where he his tortured).  We’ll then look at the last chapter, “Never Again,” which painfully details Ernie’s experience in a Nazi death camp.  Once again, we’ll take up the question of what compelled Ernie (the last of the just) to risk his life by surrendering himself to Nazi-occupied France, Drancy, and Auschwitz.
Now in its 23rd year, our informal discussion group meets via Zoom every Friday from 12-1.  Please note this change (we will reconsider resuming in-person meetings in CBI’s small chapel  starting in October).  All are welcome to attend regardless of their level of expertise.   If you have questions, please contact Jay Jacoby at jbjacoby@uncc.edu.
 

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

 
 

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Oct
25
Tue
Torah on Tap @ CBI
Oct 25 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Torah on Tap:


Tuesday, October 25, 6:00pm

Archetype Brewery, 174 Broadway St.

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YEP! (Youth Engagement Program)

Forget Sunday School. YEP! is an innovative and exciting multi-generational, hands-on Jewish educational experience for parents and their children. Once a week during the school year, families come together for experiential learning that that fosters deep relationships among families, our congregation and the greater community, while strengthening Jewish identity on a personal level. 

Learn more and reserve your place now!

Bar/Bat Mitzvah Preparation

One of the beautiful aspects of raising Jewish kids in Asheville is that they tend to grow up with a sense of groundedness. Their bar/bat mitzvah is not an over-the-top competition. It's just one of life's milestones. It's not a culmination of their Jewish learning and engagement - it's the beginning.

Bar/Bat mitzvah study is introduced early on, at least several years prior to the event. Our kids study with Josefa Briant, a former soloist in the Batsheva Dance Company (Tel Aviv) with a deep sense of spirituality. They meet as a class to acquire the skills needed to lead services. About a year out, kids begin studying one-one-one to learn their Torah portion and haftorah and begin to meet with Rabbi Justin to get a taste of what Jewish study with a chevruta (partner) is all about. After it's over, many decide to remain engaged. That is our measure of success.  

Post Bar/Bat Mitzvah Learning

The post b'nei mitzvah group is for those young adults 13 and over who have already become bar/bat mitzvvah. The student-led group meets the first Tuesday of the month with Rabbi Goldstein in a setting that is open, safe and confidential. Topics for discussion revolve around creating, growing and sustaining meaningful relationships and use both text study and discussion as tools with which to explore Jewish life and Jewish values.  For more information, please contact Rabbi Goldstein.

"I find it quite remarkable that people are both open and respectful! Open? That happens. Respectful? Not everywhere!! But always here!" - Judith Hoy

Learning for Adults

Do you ever wonder what it’s all about? Curious what Judaism has to say about today’s thornier problems? Always wanted to learn to speak Hebrew? Yiddish? Or maybe you just want to get more out of Shabbat and the other holidays. You’re in the right place. We get together weekly, monthly or whenever we can. Many, but not all, groups are led by Rabbi Justin. And not all take place at the synagogue.

Weekly/Monthly Learning

Click on a program to learn more

Learning Throughout the Year

Scholar-in-Residence

At least once each year, the CBI hosts a Scholar/Artist-in-Residence for a weekend. Previous scholars/artists include: Rabbi Harold Kushner; Israeli writer/entertainer, Danny Maseng; dancer and creator of MOVING TORAH, Andrea Hodos; storyteller and folklorist, Pennina Schram.  

Holiday Study

The holidays provide opportunities to deepen our understanding of who we are - as individuals and as a people. We take advantage of as many as we can, including Tu b'Shevat, Purim, Pesach, Shavuot, Tisha b'Av, and more.  

Dinner and a Movie

 Start with a dairy pot-luck dinner, add a few dozen of your friends, then settle in for a movie that's sure to make you laugh, cry, love, cringe or, at the very least, think.

"The culture of learning at CBI is vibrant, non-dogmatic, participatory, respectful, relevant, and evolving within the context of our growing congregation. The intellect and the spirit are equally honored." -Dr. Robert Kline